2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by tiwonge » Wed May 28, 2014 8:36 pm

Also, I wanted to mention that I appreciated the "prime" question, in particular the use of recent advances (the reference to the comb technique) in the field of twin primes. I was excited to see that in the question. It doesn't often happen in mathematics.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by gimmedatguudsuccrose » Wed May 28, 2014 8:49 pm

Now I'll actually add some substance to the conversation. The music questions, my favorite category, where very enjoyable to play. The tossup on Nocturne was pretty awesome for including non-Chopin clues, and the Bach Cello Suites tossup was great (even thought I negged it with 'unaccompanied sonatas'). Could I see the Schoenberg tossup? If I'm right, the clue about a sergeant giving commands was first line, which seemed pretty early as Survivor from Warsaw is one of his more famous works.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by Auks Ran Ova » Wed May 28, 2014 9:19 pm

Sakata Kintoki wrote:I'm curious to see where the power marks for the tossups on "A Confederacy of Dunces" and "fake leg" were located; can I see these tossups?
In Round 8, John Lawrence wrote:One character in this novel wants to create an exotic dance act in which her pet cockatoo helps her undress. A policeman in this novel is forced by his sergeant to sit in a stall in the bus station every day, wearing a different ridiculous costume, while searching for suspicious characters. In this novel, the pornography ring run out of the Night of Joy nightclub by Lana Lee is busted by Officer Mancuso. A character in this novel corresponds regularly with (*) Myrna Minkoff, and after being fired for starting a strike at the Levy Pants factory, the obese, green hunting, cap-wearing protagonist becomes a hot dog vendor. For 10 points, name this novel about the comic misadventures in New Orleans of Ignatius J. Reilly, by John Kennedy Toole.
ANSWER: A Confederacy of Dunces
In Round 18, Aidan Mehigan wrote:After the siege of Drogheda (DRAH-huh-duh), Arthur Aston was killed by being beaten with one of these objects believed to contain gold coins. One of these objects made of cork replaced another object buried with full military honors after its loss at Veracruz. Manley Pointer steals one of these objects from Mrs. Hopewell's daughter (*) Hulga in Flannery O'Connor's short story "Good Country People." Peter Stuyvesant owned one of these objects studded with silver nails. A contemporary user of a pair of these objects claims that he had not put them on before shooting through a locked bathroom door and killing girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. For 10 points, name these objects that help Oscar Pistorius run.
ANSWER: prosthetic legs [or wooden legs until "bathroom door" is read; or artificial legs, etc.; prompt on legs; prompt on answers such as artificial limbs that do not specify legs]
40th Day after death wrote:Can I see the questions on the Income Effect and Pascal's Principle?
Ah ah ah, you didn't say the magic word.
christino wrote:I remember hearing the word "denominator" for the bonus part on G in round 13, bonus 20, so I'd like to see that please.
In Round 13, Ike Jose wrote:The hypothesis that this value is inversely proportional to the age of the universe and thus decreasing was proposed by Paul Dirac. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this constant of proportionality that appears in the numerator of the equation for the Schwarzschild radius.
ANSWER: universal gravitational constant [or big G; or Newton's constant; prompt on G; do not accept "little g"]
Looks like you misheard.
Sniper, No Sniping! wrote:I'd like to see the text of the Saki tossup (because Brandon got it particularly early and I want to see any clues that came after his buzz). Also, if the tossup on David's army can be posted, that'd be cool. Our freshman went for it early, negged it with "Alexander's army" based on a clue about water I believe that sounded similar to an apocryphal story about Alexander's army. Thx
In Round 9, Itamar Naveh-Benjamin wrote:In one short story by this author, a "secretary" pretends he is planning the execution of twenty-six Jews to give the Huddle siblings the title "Unrest Cure". In another story by this author, a fifteen-year old describes her aunt's "great tragedy". This creator of Clovis Sangrail also created a character who lives near a Houdan hen and is praised by Conradin for slaying the disagreeable Mrs. De Ropp; that character is a (*) pole-cat ferret named Sredni Vashtar. This author wrote a short story in which Framton Nuttel is duped into believing that Mrs. Sappleton's husband perished, leading to his astonishment upon seeing that same husband returning home through the title opening. For 10 points, name this British author of "The Open Window".
ANSWER: Saki [or Hector Hugh Munro]
In Round 15, Auroni Gupta wrote:On a snowy day, one member of this group had chased a lion into a pit and killed it. A few members of this group went to procure a drink of water, but the recipient poured it out on the ground, asking "Is it not the blood of men who went at the risk of their lives?" The Bible places these men into divisions like the Three and the Thirty. Because a member of this group refused an order to go home and wash his feet, he was murdered by being placed in the (*) front lines, an act which prompted Nathan to admonish the giver of that order. Joab commanded this group, which included Bathsheba's husband Uriah the Hittite. For 10 points, name this group that fought for the killer of Goliath.
ANSWER: David's army [or the army of Israel; or the army of the Israelites; or David's soldiers; or synonyms stating that these are men fighting for David; or David's Thirty and David's Three before they are mentioned; or the Mighty Warriors]
johntait1 wrote:Now, one thing that really confused me was the tossup on Temple Mount. I buzzed in with "the Temple" because I heard that it was the site of Araunah's threshing floor, which according to the Bible is where the Temple was located http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araunah I was really confused when the moderator prompted me, and I said First Temple because I remembered the part from the Bible. Could I see the question, and could someone explain how I was supposed to know it was Temple Mount and not the Temple? Thanks!
Another thing that confused me was the tossup in the all star game on "Jude". I remembered thinking it was Phillip because of several clues. I can't remember the first few, but I was pretty much certain when I heard something along the lines that "he was with Bartholomew", as the Bible states that Phillip and Bartholomew were together http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartholomew_the_Apostle I also thought I heard something about "this apostle", and Jude was clearly not an apostle, just the brother of Jesus. Could someone post that question? Maybe my hearing was off.
In Round 5, Matt Bollinger wrote:This area is identified with the threshing floor bought from Araunah for fifty pieces of silver to relieve a plague. Solomon's Stables can be found to the southeast of this place. A building in this place contains the Well of Souls within its Foundation Stone. By visiting this walled-in trapezoidal area, Ariel (*) Sharon provoked the Second Intifada. In Jewish tradition, it is identified with Moriah, where Abraham bound Isaac; Muslims venerate it because it contains the al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock. For 10 points, name this elevated site in Jerusalem once thought to be the site of the Holy of Holies.
ANSWER: the Temple Mount [or the Noble Sanctuary; or Haram al-Sharif]
I defer explanation to someone more knowledgeable than I.
In the All-Star Game, Auroni Gupta wrote:This man is the presumed author of a canonical epistle that quotes the noncanonical Book of Enoch and refers to a fight between Satan and Michael over Moses' body. In the Gospel of John, this disciple asks Christ why he doesn't manifest himself to the whole world at the Last Supper. Along with Bartholomew, this saint first spread the Gospel to Armenia. The penultimate book of the New Testament is this saint's (*) epistle. Mentions of this apostle, who is often equated with Thaddeus, are typically appended with "of James" so as to distinguish this saint from an apostle with a similar name. For 10 points, name this patron saint of lost causes, the namesake of a children's hospital.
ANSWER: Saint Jude [or Jude of James; or Judas Thaddaeus; or Lebbaeus; or Thaddeus until it is read; or Judas not Iscariot; do not accept or prompt on "Judas" alone]
These clues are definitely about Jude the Apostle, who is distinct from (but sometimes identified with) Jude, the brother of Jesus. Philip and Bartholomew are indeed often mentioned together, but that's not what the clue's talking about.
Alexandrescu wrote:Could I see the Schoenberg tossup? If I'm right, the clue about a sergeant giving commands was first line, which seemed pretty early as Survivor from Warsaw is one of his more famous works.
In Round 15, John Lawrence wrote:This composer wrote a work that describes a sergeant barking at his soldiers to count faster. A male chorus singing the "Shema Yisroel" concludes that work by this man, in which a narrator reads an account of Jews being rounded up in a ghetto. This composer used a controversial "inverted ninth" chord in a a string sextet inspired by a poem about a woman telling her lover that she is bearing another man's child that was written by (*) Richard Dehmel. This composer of A Survivor from Warsaw developed a system by which all the pitches of a chromatic scale are arranged without repetition into a "tone row". For 10 points, name this composer of Transfigured Night, a leader of the Second Viennese School who developed "twelve-tone technique".
ANSWER: Arnold Schoenberg
I'm certainly comfortable giving you power for recognizing that clue.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by johntait1 » Wed May 28, 2014 9:53 pm

Ukonvasara wrote:
In the All-Star Game, Auroni Gupta wrote:This man is the presumed author of a canonical epistle that quotes the noncanonical Book of Enoch and refers to a fight between Satan and Michael over Moses' body. In the Gospel of John, this disciple asks Christ why he doesn't manifest himself to the whole world at the Last Supper. Along with Bartholomew, this saint first spread the Gospel to Armenia. The penultimate book of the New Testament is this saint's (*) epistle. Mentions of this apostle, who is often equated with Thaddeus, are typically appended with "of James" so as to distinguish this saint from an apostle with a similar name. For 10 points, name this patron saint of lost causes, the namesake of a children's hospital.
ANSWER: Saint Jude [or Jude of James; or Judas Thaddaeus; or Lebbaeus; or Thaddeus until it is read; or Judas not Iscariot; do not accept or prompt on "Judas" alone]
These clues are definitely about Jude the Apostle, who is distinct from (but sometimes identified with) Jude, the brother of Jesus. Philip and Bartholomew are indeed often mentioned together, but that's not what the clue's talking about. The next two clues seem to
First of all, I recognize that I was wrong about the Bartholomew part. I wasn't playing so I wasn't paying close enough attention.
The thing that still confuses me is that I was under the impression that Jude, the brother of Jesus, is commonly accepted as the author of the Book of Jude http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epistle_of_Jude and thus the first clue seems to refer to Jude, the brother of Jesus. The next two clues then seem to refer to Jude the Apostle, while the fourth clue once again clearly refers to Jude the brother of Jesus as the Book of Jude is the second to last book of the New Testament. To add to the confusion, the question states that "of James" is added to distinguish this saint from an apostle of a similar name, but Jude the brother of Jesus is usually not referred to as an apostle, since "apostle" is usually used to refer to the "12 disciples"(which Jude the Brother of Jesus was not one of), and Matthias and Paul(added later). I am by no means an expert in theology though, so maybe Corin from LASA could offer some help since I heard his dad is a preacher?
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by iamapagan » Wed May 28, 2014 11:09 pm

Could I please see the following TU: air pressure, Odin, Zeus, and molar mass (to know when power ends on each of these)
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by gustavadolf » Wed May 28, 2014 11:22 pm

Wikipedia wrote:Opinion is divided on whether Jude the apostle is the same as Jude, brother of Jesus, who is mentioned in Mark 6:3 and Matthew 13:55-57, and is the traditional author of the Epistle of Jude. Some Catholics believe the two Judes are the same person, while a number of Protestants do not.
I'd always heard that there were two distinct figures named Jude in the early church, but evidently this is a matter of some disagreement. If one accepts that there are two distinct Judes, which this question seems to, then it seems like there's a bit of a mess as to which one the clues are pointing to (as Daniel pointed out, Jude the Apostle is usually not held to be the Jude who wrote Jude). In my opinion, this would work best as a common-link on the name Jude in the New Testament, as it dodges the whole identity controversy.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by Auroni » Wed May 28, 2014 11:59 pm

In the Bible, he's often called Jude or Judas of James so as to disambiguate him from Judas Iscariot.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by The Stately Rhododendron » Thu May 29, 2014 12:03 am

I had a problem with the Temple mount being described as "once thought to be the site of the Holy of Holies." This is still a very widespread belief.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by Auks Ran Ova » Thu May 29, 2014 12:42 am

iamapagan wrote:Could I please see the following TU: air pressure, Odin, Zeus, and molar mass (to know when power ends on each of these)
In Round 11, Cody Voight wrote:The measurement of this quantity by radiosonde uses an aneroid cell, which is made of a beryllium-copper alloy, has had part of its air evacuated, and is attached to a stiff spring. A geopotential height is indexed to a constant value for this quantity. The force due to this quantity's gradient is balanced by the Coriolis force for geostrophic winds. The eye of a cyclone has a much (*) lower value for this quantity relative to outside of the cyclone and is thus depicted on a weather map with a red L. This quantity is commonly measured in inches of mercury of millibars, and it is measured with a barometer. For 10 points, identify this force that the weight of the atmosphere exerts on objects.
ANSWER: air pressure [or atmospheric pressure]
In Round 11, Matt Bollinger wrote:In one account, this god fathers the Hunnish king Sigi and has his wife give Rerir a fertility-granting golden apple; in that same collection, he challenges guests at a wedding feast to draw a sword out of the oak tree Barnstokk. In a different story, this god turns into a snake to fit through a hole in a mountain after spending a summer as Baugi's servant. He habitually seeks counsel from the head of (*) Mimir, who once guarded a well where this god made a sacrifice. This god, who retrieves the mead of poetry, scopes out the earth from Hlidskjalf and gives his meat to the wolves Geri and Freki. This god rides on the eight-legged horse Sleipnir. For 10 points, name this one-eyed, spear-carrying chief god in Norse myth.
ANSWER: Odin [or Wotan]
In Round 12, Ike Jose wrote:When this god was still in the womb, his mother pressed her fingers on the soil to create the dactyls. He once suspended his wife from the clouds using a silver thread while her feet were tied with anvils. With his son, this god was fed by the elderly Phrygian couple Baucis and Philemon, and he turned them into an oak and linden tree for their hospitality. While this god was a child, the (*) Curetes made loud noises to mask his crying. In one story, this god gave a mortal woman Laelaps, a javelin that never missed and Talos. In that story, this god transformed into a white bull to abduct Europa. For 10 points, name this Greek god who struck down his foes with lightning bolts.
ANSWER: Zeus [or Jupiter]
In Round 13, Adam Silverman wrote:The logarithm of viscosity is linearly related to the logarithm of this quantity in the Mark-Houwink-Sakurada equation. Osmometry experiments measure the number-average form of this quantity. The polydispersity index measures the variance of this quantity in a polymer. This quantity is empirically calculated as the cryoscopic constant times mass fraction divided by the change in temperature. The rate of (*) effusion is inversely proportional to the square root of this quantity according to Graham's Law. For an ideal gas, it equals the density times RT over the pressure. For carbon dioxide, it's 44. For 10 points, name this quantity, the sum of the atomic masses in a molecule.
ANSWER: molar mass [or molecular mass; or molecular weight; or formula weight; prompt on mass or weight]
Mr. Joyboy wrote:I had a problem with the Temple mount being described as "once thought to be the site of the Holy of Holies." This is still a very widespread belief.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by WildKard » Thu May 29, 2014 9:32 am

I thought the tossup on bits was really inventive, but I wasn't sure what a few of the things were referring to. Could I please see the tossup?
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by The King's Flight to the Scots » Thu May 29, 2014 10:42 am

I thought that calling the Temple Mount "this area" would indicate that the question was looking for a zone of space and not a specific structure in that zone. Apparently this didn't come across the way I'd intended it to; apologies for that.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by johntait1 » Thu May 29, 2014 2:36 pm

gustavadolf wrote:
Wikipedia wrote:Opinion is divided on whether Jude the apostle is the same as Jude, brother of Jesus, who is mentioned in Mark 6:3 and Matthew 13:55-57, and is the traditional author of the Epistle of Jude. Some Catholics believe the two Judes are the same person, while a number of Protestants do not.
I'd always heard that there were two distinct figures named Jude in the early church, but evidently this is a matter of some disagreement. If one accepts that there are two distinct Judes, which this question seems to, then it seems like there's a bit of a mess as to which one the clues are pointing to (as Daniel pointed out, Jude the Apostle is usually not held to be the Jude who wrote Jude). In my opinion, this would work best as a common-link on the name Jude in the New Testament, as it dodges the whole identity controversy.
Ok, so I'm glad that I'm not the only one who's heard of two Judes. I guess the problem here is the writer thought there was one, but there's debate over whether there is actually one or two. I definitely agree with Corin that a question on the name Jude would have been a great solution.
Auroni wrote:In the Bible, he's often called Jude or Judas of James so as to disambiguate him from Judas Iscariot.
So I realize now that the clue on distinguishing from another apostle was about Judas Iscariot, and not talking about the two Judes thing like I thought it meant. In that case does that mean that the question takes the side that Jude the Apostle and Jude the Brother of Jesus is the same person? If so, could I know where that came from? I've always heard that there's two Judes but is it generally accepted in quizbowl that there's only one? From the Wikipedia article I guess its because I'm not Catholic?
Anyway the good thing was that it wasn't a question in a round that mattered, just the all star game.
Vernon Lee Bad Marriage, Jr. wrote:I thought that calling the Temple Mount "this area" would indicate that the question was looking for a zone of space and not a specific structure in that zone. Apparently this didn't come across the way I'd intended it to; apologies for that.
I guess maybe I should have realized that it was not like every other "temple" answerline where the question mentions "this building". Out of curiosity, if I had protested that, would it have been awarded to me? It didn't matter in the end, but I'd like to know for future tournaments in case I misinterpret what the question was asking for again.
Another thing that I'd like to bring up is that I felt most of the Christianity questions were on stuff that I felt were actually important when I read the Bible. For example, the friends of Job play a huge role in the Book of Job and the part where I got it about how the last one refutes the first three was something that stood out when I was reading Job. On the third bonus part about Ephesians about wives submitting to their husbands is something I hear being talked about all the time. This was really nice because most of the time to leadins to Christianity tossups and the third part bonuses are really obscure stuff that don't seem important at all(for example, a question on one of the four gospels that lists a slight difference in a minor story between this gospel and another), but the stuff at PACE was mostly stuff that definitely catches my attention every time I read those passages. Again I don't actually have any knowledge in theology so maybe the stuff that usually comes up is more "theologically important" than the stuff at this tournament, but I personally really enjoyed the Christianity tossups. I want to thank all of the Christianity writers and let them know that the points I'm bringing up does not mean that I disliked the Christianity tossups in general.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by Schmidt Sting Pain Index » Thu May 29, 2014 3:22 pm

johntait1 wrote:There were a few ones that were buzzer races; I lost the buzzer race to Eric Xu on the "Italy" tossup when "Red Brigades" was mentioned, and lost the buzzer race on "Ming" when they mentioned the giraffe, but overall the history tossups were really nice, with very few buzzer races.
Can I see the Italy tossup please? I got a pretty quick power off of something about the P2 Masonic Lodge, which doesn't seem very deserved from my point of view (as something really important and mentioned many times in past Quizbowl questions), and I would like to see the other clues since it seems to have gone fairly late between two great teams.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by Auks Ran Ova » Thu May 29, 2014 5:57 pm

WildKard wrote:I thought the tossup on bits was really inventive, but I wasn't sure what a few of the things were referring to. Could I please see the tossup?
In Round 18, Mike Bentley wrote:An infinite number of these objects comprise the Baum-Sweet sequence. A rudimentary form of error checking involves utilizing a parity one of these objects. Although it doesn't involve cin and cout, in languages with C syntax, operations named for these objects can be performed by using two less than or greater than signs, which are left and right shifts. The most significant one is often used to store (*) signedness, and they can be toggled using a namesake mask. One of these objects can be used to store a boolean value. In most systems, a collection of eight of them is known as a byte. For 10 points, name these most basic units of data in a computer, which can be 0 or 1.
ANSWER: bits [prompt on numbers]
Schmidt Sting Pain Index wrote:Can I see the Italy tossup please? I got a pretty quick power off of something about the P2 Masonic Lodge, which doesn't seem very deserved from my point of view (as something really important and mentioned many times in past Quizbowl questions), and I would like to see the other clues since it seems to have gone fairly late between two great teams.
In Round 17, Stephen Liu wrote:In this country, the far-left October 22 Circle attempted to attack a US consulate. This country was home to a Masonic lodge called P2, which collaborated with a NATO stay-behind program called Operation Gladio to combat Communist influence. A film whose English title is Marianne and Juliane provided a name for an era of turmoil here, during which the leader of its Christian Democracy party was (*) killed and stuffed in a car trunk by the Red Brigades. Aldo Moro died during this coutry's violent Years of Lead in the 1970s and 80s. It has more recently been led by a media tycoon who hosted a series of "bunga bunga" parties, leading to his 2013 conviction for underage prostitution. For 10 points, name this European country home to Silvio Berlusconi.
ANSWER: Italy [or Italian Republic; or Repubblica italiana]
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by The Stately Rhododendron » Thu May 29, 2014 6:10 pm

Schmidt Sting Pain Index wrote:
johntait1 wrote:There were a few ones that were buzzer races; I lost the buzzer race to Eric Xu on the "Italy" tossup when "Red Brigades" was mentioned, and lost the buzzer race on "Ming" when they mentioned the giraffe, but overall the history tossups were really nice, with very few buzzer races.
Can I see the Italy tossup please? I got a pretty quick power off of something about the P2 Masonic Lodge, which doesn't seem very deserved from my point of view (as something really important and mentioned many times in past Quizbowl questions), and I would like to see the other clues since it seems to have gone fairly late between two great teams.
I'd agree on the importance of p2 but I'm not sure it's exactly pin-factory level.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by Remembered Guy » Thu May 29, 2014 6:12 pm

Can I see the tossups on mitzvot and first born sons? I got them both early, but I want to both see the rest of the clues as well as see if the content of the mitzvot tossup made commandments as an answer not correct in any sense.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by The King's Flight to the Scots » Thu May 29, 2014 6:50 pm

B-Rob and Hemingway- showing the way wrote:Can I see the tossups on mitzvot and first born sons? I got them both early, but I want to both see the rest of the clues as well as see if the content of the mitzvot tossup made commandments as an answer not correct in any sense.
Commandments should have been promptable, with anything more specific ("Jewish commandments," "613 commandments") acceptable. I wasn't aware that they were known by anything other than the Hebrew term.
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by Beevor Feevor » Tue Jun 03, 2014 9:27 pm

Could I see the tossup on the USA in drama? I was curious to see what clues could be selected as middle ones in that tossup without making it too transparent. Also, could I see the tossup on the Soviet nuclear program? I misinterepreted a clue at the beginning of that tossup and wanted to see what it was actually referring to. Thanks!
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by Auks Ran Ova » Thu Jun 12, 2014 1:05 am

Einhard wrote:Could I see the tossup on the USA in drama? I was curious to see what clues could be selected as middle ones in that tossup without making it too transparent. Also, could I see the tossup on the Soviet nuclear program? I misinterepreted a clue at the beginning of that tossup and wanted to see what it was actually referring to. Thanks!
Sorry for the delay in posting these!
In Round 18, Aidan Mehigan wrote:The 2010 Tony Award for Best Play went to an author from this country who depicted Ken helping Mark Rothko paint the Four Seasons murals in Red. One author from this country collected such plays as Sure Thing and Words, Words, Words in his series All in the Timing, which also contains his Variations on the Death of Trotsky. This is the home country of John (*) Logan and David Ives. In one play by an author from this country, Don, Teach, and Bobby plan to steal a coin with a buffalo on it, and in another play, that author described the attempts of Ricky Roma and Shelley “The Machine” Levene to acquire real estate leads. For 10 points, name this home country of the author of Glengarry Glen Ross, David Mamet.
ANSWER: United States of America [accept either underlined portion; accept USA]
In Round 11, Chris Ray wrote:This effort created a location dubbed "the polygon," which was campaigned against by nationalist poet Olzhas Suleimenov. In later years, this effort resulted in Chagan, a response to Operation Plowshare. This effort worked largely from translated copies of the Smyth report, since many of its participants were afraid to request data provided by Klaus Fuchs. This effort created sites like Mayak and (*) Semipalatinsk, where it culminated in First Lightning, nicknamed "Joe-1" by foreign intelligence. Its architects included Igor Kurchatov and future Nobel laureate Andrei Sakharov. For 10 points, name this project aided by the espionage of the Rosenberg couple, which, following a 1949 test in Kazakhstan, created the second nuclear power in history.
ANSWER: Soviet nuclear weapons program [accept any reasonable equivalents, including Russian for “Soviet”]
Rob Carson
University of Minnesota '11, MCTC '??
Member, ACF
Member, PACE
Writer and Editor, NAQT

njsbling
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Re: 2014 PACE NSC Questions Discussion

Post by njsbling » Sat Jun 14, 2014 3:24 am

The 2014 PACE NSC set has been posted to the packet archive and can be found here: http://www.quizbowlpackets.com/656/
Nicholas Karas
Member, Northern California Quiz Bowl Alliance
Outreach Coordinator, National Academic Quiz Tournaments

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