Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

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Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by at your pleasure »

Where are mythology, anthropology, and sociology and branches therof? Those are all reasonably important things.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Auroni »

jrbarry wrote:And, of course, there is nowhere near any consensus about what the best distribution is.
This is untrue.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Mechanical Beasts »

Censorship in Burma wrote:
jrbarry wrote:And, of course, there is nowhere near any consensus about what the best distribution is.
This is untrue.
Well, there's certainly not "consensus" per se, given that we've recently had arguments about whether trash and geography have a place. And people have discussed different distributional philosophies: are literature and mythology logically a continuum (requiring, in most minds, the literature-plus-myth category to be bigger than history)? should we consider 3/3 SS+phil and 2/2 RM? All these questions could be settled in different ways and either way give the ACF distribution--or a different one.

What is generally settled (I mean: to most people I have talked to) is that religion, mythology, philosophy, social science, and history should combined make up more than 25% of a packet; the ACF distribution for 20/20 puts them at 37.5%.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Rountree »

Andy,

I couldn't agree with you more about a lack of consensus on a preferred format/distribution on these boards, much less the larger quiz bowl community not represented here.

However, I find your last comment the most interesting because it is so different from what is generally settled (among most of the people I have talked to) about distribution. Many of those aforementioned people usually assign mythology under the Literature umbrella while social sciences, philosophy, and history are labeled as Social Studies. While this "Social Studies" distribution is certainly less than the nearly 40% of a round a la ACF, it is somewhat closer than one might think upon first inspection if you were to add a mythology question from the Literature group into the equation.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Matt Weiner »

For good or bad, the fact is that "social studies" as a quizbowl category is basically a concept unique to Georgia. Other places use "history," "religion," "philosophy," et cetera as separate distributions.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Auroni »

Crazy Andy Watkins wrote:
Censorship in Burma wrote:
jrbarry wrote:And, of course, there is nowhere near any consensus about what the best distribution is.
This is untrue.
Well, there's certainly not "consensus" per se, given that we've recently had arguments about whether trash and geography have a place
Right, but that only affects at most 2/2 or 3/3, and so 87.5% of the distribution is pretty much agreed on, in that there is a big three and then fine arts and RMP for mACF questions. What this tournament is trying to do is make sweeping changes from that basic model on the pretense that "there is nowhere near a consensus" for the distribution, when in fact only a small portion of it is really in contention and everyone agrees about the rest of it.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Mechanical Beasts »

elrountree wrote:However, I find your last comment the most interesting because it is so different from what is generally settled (among most of the people I have talked to) about distribution. Many of those aforementioned people usually assign mythology under the Literature umbrella while social sciences, philosophy, and history are labeled as Social Studies. While this "Social Studies" distribution is certainly less than the nearly 40% of a round a la ACF, it is somewhat closer than one might think upon first inspection if you were to add a mythology question from the Literature group into the equation.
None of the quizbowl organizations with a national scope that I know of that have a track record of producing good questions (namely, PACE, NAQT, HSAPQ) have a "social studies" distribution. That doesn't mean that it's impossible to write good questions if you think of social studies in a unified way; it does mean that not many people do on the whole.

Anyway, you're right: if you take the expectation to squeeze in myth out of that 25%, then you're a little closer; you're putting 32.5% (under the ACF distro) into 25%. So sure, I'll give you that.

All this could be remedied by removing 10% tricks you could teach a monkey and asking math theory questions in science. But you knew that already, sir.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Rountree »

Matt,

I don't believe it is unique to Georgia. I know of at least 1 other house-written tournament currently posted on these boards (Ezell Harding) that also uses that same nomenclature to describe their distribution. Perhaps a more thorough investigation would yield others like these two? Maybe the difference in distribution is more regional and less one state's particular choices?


Auroni,

I don't think Mr. Barry's tournament is making any changes from a basic model that "everyone" agrees upon since his tournament has been around for over 20 years, which predates both you and ACF (as an organization) by at least a couple of years. Also, who is "everyone" that you reference in your post: "everyone" who posts on this board, "everyone" in California, "everyone" at Torrey Pines, "everyone" at ACF?
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Mechanical Beasts »

Censorship in Burma wrote: Right, but that only affects at most 2/2 or 3/3, and so 87.5% of the distribution is pretty much agreed on, in that there is a big three and then fine arts and RMP for mACF questions. What this tournament is trying to do is make sweeping changes from that basic model on the pretense that "there is nowhere near a consensus" for the distribution, when in fact only a small portion of it is really in contention and everyone agrees about the rest of it.
That's why I didn't use the "nowhere near" language. And I don't know if it's that divergent from expected distributions. Ignoring math computation, which is just beyond the pale, does this shift back and forth more than 2/2 or 3/3 of the distribution? Not really. Is it a divergent philosophy of organizing a distribution? Certainly, but if I declare that "humanities" is defined as lit and arts and say that there ought to be 8/8 humanities in a submitted packet and 5/5 should be "paper humanities," then I have the same result.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by jrbarry »

We include mythology in our lit category. We include philosophy in our social studies category.

We don't have any anthropology in our tournaments.

Matt: I (and my teams in th past) have written questions for state competitions in Arkansas and Alabama and both used social studies as a category or heading for subcategories (which is really what it is for our tounaments.) At least those two states used it when communicating with me about what to write. That term has also been used in communicating between folks in North Carolina and Kansas and Colorado for whom we have written questions. So, it is certainly not unique to quiz bowl in Georgia.

Looking at the larger picture, social studies is a term used in many states for curriculum requirements for courses for graduation. History, government, economics, geography, psychology, philosophy, anthropology, and sociology generally fall under that category heading. As a quiz bowl person who has, and continues to, argue for some (but not total) correlation between subject matter asked in quiz bowl questions and subject matter topics used in high school classes, I find the use of the category heading socal studies appropriate.

I understand that there are certain ideas and positions that dominate thinking on this board, but as I have said before, this board does not reflect quiz bowl in every part of the US as our membership is limited and ther number of people who post regulary here is even more limited.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Auroni »

Crazy Andy Watkins wrote:
Censorship in Burma wrote: Right, but that only affects at most 2/2 or 3/3, and so 87.5% of the distribution is pretty much agreed on, in that there is a big three and then fine arts and RMP for mACF questions. What this tournament is trying to do is make sweeping changes from that basic model on the pretense that "there is nowhere near a consensus" for the distribution, when in fact only a small portion of it is really in contention and everyone agrees about the rest of it.
That's why I didn't use the "nowhere near" language. And I don't know if it's that divergent from expected distributions. Ignoring math computation, which is just beyond the pale, does this shift back and forth more than 2/2 or 3/3 of the distribution? Not really. Is it a divergent philosophy of organizing a distribution? Certainly, but if I declare that "humanities" is defined as lit and arts and say that there ought to be 8/8 humanities in a submitted packet and 5/5 should be "paper humanities," then I have the same result.
Yeah, but we were discussing the specific recent debate about the inclusion of trash and geography, and the distribution change you suggested in this post doesn't really represent the model of quizbowl accepted nationally.

Also, I posted here specifically to address the phrase "nowhere near a consensus" in a vacuum; I don't want to get involved in the very same argument we have re: computational math.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by at your pleasure »

The problem with using "Social Studies" as a category is that it confuses the discussion by lumping a large number of things in a group of questions and making it harder to see how those things are weighted.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by jrbarry »

I have listed what the subcategories are (and in percentages of questions asked) under Social Studies in posts in this thread.

In 21 years of hosting two very large high school tournaments a year, not one person has ever asked me to explain what our social studies category means. (I have received questions about myth being under lit and geology being under science, though). I am not the least bit bothered by answering that question, but it is interesting that not one coach or player has ever asked me that since 1988. That would be an indication that folks in the Southeast seem to understand what it means at least in the general sense. (I have anywhere from 96 to 168 teams from as many as 90 high school in 22 states that have attended tournaments at my school.)
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Sir Thopas »

jrbarry wrote:In 21 years of hosting two very large high school tournaments a year, not one person has ever asked me to explain what our social studies category means. (I have received questions about myth being under lit and geology being under science, though). I am not the least bit bothered by answering that question, but it is interesting that not one coach or player has ever asked me that since 1988. That would be an indication that folks in the Southeast seem to understand what it means at least in the general sense. (I have anywhere from 96 to 168 teams from as many as 90 high school in 22 states that have attended tournaments at my school.)
Well, this leads to otherwise uncovered effects like surprise lack of anthropology.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by jrbarry »

Well, we might actually have some anthro and archeo questions masking under the guise of geography. Plus, Anthropology is not even taught in most GA public schools.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

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jrbarry wrote:In 21 years of hosting two very large high school tournaments a year, not one person has ever asked me to explain what our social studies category means. (I have received questions about myth being under lit and geology being under science, though). I am not the least bit bothered by answering that question, but it is interesting that not one coach or player has ever asked me that since 1988. That would be an indication that folks in the Southeast seem to understand what it means at least in the general sense. (I have anywhere from 96 to 168 teams from as many as 90 high school in 22 states that have attended tournaments at my school.)
Well, isn't this precisely why we discuss things? Suppose my ancestor hosted the first quizbowl tournament ever hundreds of years ago, and the distribution was equally split between cathedrals, scholastic philosophy, and history. If my people and I never spoke to anyone else about how they run quizbowl tournaments, it's possible, if unlikely, that my distributional philosophy would persist to this day in my community. Now, your distribution isn't nearly so absurd, and neither is the ACF distribution. But doesn't this illustrate that it's necessary that different communities with different standards ask each other why they do what they do?
jrbarry wrote:Plus, Anthropology is not even taught in most GA public schools.
That's irrelevant to its academic import, and most contemporary thought about this game is that it should prioritize what's important in academia rather than mirroring exactly what happens in class--otherwise, why encourage kids to do quizbowl instead of just telling them to study harder for class? And as you've surely heard before, I bet that most GA public high schools don't make kids practice arithmetic for speed, and yet you choose to test it.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by jrbarry »

Andrew:

I am on this board discussing "things." Most quiz bowl coaches are not here.

I meant AD1988 when dating the origins of the BISB. :grin:

Many subjects of great academic import (advanced linguistics as an example) are not subcategories for questions in our two high school tournaments. We ask more than any player would learn in his/her high school classes. But we start with high school curriculum topics.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

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jrbarry wrote:Andrew:

I am on this board discussing "things." Most quiz bowl coaches are not here.

I meant AD1988 when dating the origins of the BISB. :grin:
True, and that's precisely what i mean: if you weren't on the board, we'd get no input from your perspective of how quizbowl ought to be. Similarly, you'd get no input from our perspective since you'd only be exposed to coaches from your own area, which has a unique flavor compared to the national circuit. You'd said that it was funny that no one you talk to regularly is confused or concerned about "social studies"; I find that predictable rather than unusual. Does that make sense?
jrbarry wrote:Many subjects of great academic import (advanced linguistics as an example) are not subcategories for questions in our two high school tournaments. We ask more than any player would learn in his/her high school classes. But we start with high school curriculum topics.
Well, that's because "advanced linguistics" is inaccessible to high school students. Chomsky's basic works aren't; basic terminology isn't. Similarly, anthropology is totally accessible and intimately connected to classroom topics, to boot. And if the majority of your math is arithmetic tricks, there's 10% of your distribution in which you're asking far, far less--so you might as well make up for it by touching on a little bit of highly accessible anthropology.
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by Theory Of The Leisure Flask »

I don't specifically remember whether "social studies" was ever considered a category for quizbowl purposes in NJ circa 2000, but I do remember taking "social studies" classes from 1st through 8th grade. These tended to be a mix of American history, basic civics, geography, and very occasionally some other stuff. My sense is that it's a real term that means a real thing to educators, but to an outsider can appear to be a weird mishmash of disciplines.

Which means it's not really all that different from the "RMP" moniker. Or, heck, "social science"- do fields like clinical psych, archaeology, and international relations really have all that much in common?

Anyway, (leaving aside the compmath) I don't see any big problem with this distribution; in fact I find it self-evident that different levels of play should tweak their distributions to better reflect the realities of what their target audience is likely to have heard of. Having philosophy and "social sciences" like anthropology come up more in the college game and somewhat less in HS seems eminently reasonable to me. (Conversely, geography is one subject that IMO ought to come up less often in college instead.)
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Re: Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl November 21, 2009

Post by jrbarry »

I was trying to avoid commenting on your references in terms of our math questions as I was attacked pretty vociferously when I just mentioned that topic a month or so ago.. But...OK, we do have all kinds of math questions in our tournaments including ones that reward players who can calculate accurately and quickly.

I did not realize that you had read our math questions. Interesting.

I know what "predictable" means. I also know what unusual means. My comment about being asked questions about what social studies means/includes uses the word unusual correctly. It was not my usual question and thus I labeled it unusual. Seems pretty noncontroversial.

Now, I will ask you exactly what you mean by choosing the word "predictable" to characterize my point (rather than my use of unusual.)
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Stained Diviner »

Add Illinois to the list of states that use Social Studies as a category.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by cdcarter »

I don't specifically remember whether "social studies" was ever considered a category for quizbowl purposes in NJ circa 2000, but I do remember taking "social studies" classes from 1st through 8th grade. These tended to be a mix of American history, basic civics, geography, and very occasionally some other stuff. My sense is that it's a real term that means a real thing to educators, but to an outsider can appear to be a weird mishmash of disciplines.
Social Studies is a category that solidly has meaning within pedagogy and especially primary and secondary education.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Matt Weiner »

cdcarter wrote:Social Studies is a category that solidly has meaning within pedagogy and especially primary and secondary education.
Well, it's certainly a thing that exists, though how much meaning it conveys is debatable. Some places take "social studies" classes, but many others still have "history" classes. It's unwise to generalize into statements about education in general from the way Georgia does things. And, of course, the notion that high school quizbowl in any sense either is or should be based on "the curriculum" (which curriculum, in any case?) is simply untenable.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Huang »

Matt Weiner wrote:And, of course, the notion that high school quizbowl in any sense either is or should be based on "the curriculum" (which curriculum, in any case?) is simply untenable.
Would the Advanced Placement curriculum be somewhat appropriate for determining if something could be included in the quizbowl canon? Not stuff like "well this one time my teacher taught us <obscure knowledge>" but more like "this <relatively important knowledge> appears in various Advanced Placement preparation books." Or would that be also untenable?
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Nick »

I know for a fact that Dorman's Cav Challenge, the biggest tournament in South Carolina (100+ teams), has used a "social studies" subdistribution for the past three years, similiar to the BISB. So I suppose we share that unique quizbowl flavor with Georgia.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Auks Ran Ova »

Nick wrote:I know for a fact that Dorman's Cav Challenge, the biggest tournament in South Carolina (100+ teams), has used a "social studies" subdistribution for the past three years, similiar to the BISB. So I suppose we share that unique quizbowl flavor with Georgia.
The point, I think, is that "Social Studies", both as a subdistribution and as a class, is nowhere near universal. For instance: both nationally respected question-writing companies (NAQT and HSAPQ) use "history" to describe history questions and group the other components of "social studies" elsewhere; also, in my educational experience, the concept of calling a class "social studies" ended after middle school, where it had always basically referred to history anyway.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Mechanical Beasts »

The Social Studies special concentration at Harvard blends political science, sociology, and history, and you're allowed to control completely the classes you take to meet the needs of the thesis you want to write. Seeing as there's next to no workable political science at the high school level and your social studies distribution contains no sociology--you see where I'm going with this. Everyone's take on "social studies" is different.

Granted, and here's where I may diverge from many other people on this board--if Georgia wants to call the sum of history and social science and ballet and Robert Browning poems "social studies," and all of Georgia understands that that's what "social studies" is, then that's totally fine with me. (It'll take some explaining to everyone else, but that doesn't mean you're hurting anyone.) It's a different distributional philosophy, but just as even most ACF partisans are comfortable with NAQT merging myth and lit, so long as NAQT makes sure that there's an amount of each that those partisans finds to be within the realm of acceptable, I don't think many of us care about your distributional philosophy--do you call this "social studies?" do you put continental philosophy in social science? do you do a cartwheel before writing each science question?--so much as we care about the actual content of the distribution, and we worry that having a 25% social studies distribution could be problematic.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Stained Diviner »

I think we're getting to the point here and identifying the issue.

First of all, what Brookwood specifically and Georgia generally do is actually fairly common. If you look at distributions that were created by high school teachers in the 1970s and 1980s, what you will generally find is that the Big Four were Literature/Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies and that the Little Two were Fine Arts and Miscellaneous. In Georgia, the Big Three were Literature/Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies, and the Little Two were Fine Arts and Math. The most important part of Social Studies was History, and it also included the other topics Mr. Barry listed such as Geography, Current Events, Religion, Psychology, and Social Science. People who stayed within their own sphere generally didn't complain much about those distributions. Those distributions, with minor adjustments made over the years, are still used in many states with large circuits.

If you look at distributions that were created by college students in the 1990s, there are some similarities and some significant differences. The Big Three were History, Literature, and Science, the Medium Three were Fine Arts, RMP, and Social Science, and some other stuff was thrown in as well such as Geography and Pop Culture.

In addition to the obvious differences between these two general distributions (Math, RMP, and Social Science), anybody who thinks about it for three seconds will realize that making History one of the Big Three as opposed to a part of one of the Big Three (or Four) is a significant difference. I think we're all agreed on that point. Putting Social Studies, as opposed to History, on an equal footing with Science and Literature gives you less History.

The two points of disagreement are:
1) Some people seem to by saying that Brookwood's distribution is completely out of the mainstream and that it needs to change right now to be taken seriously by the overall quizbowl community because nobody will stand for this, and that if it does not change then this tournament is an invalid waste of everybody's time. Hopefully, I am just misinterpreting people making this argument, because this point of view is wrong.
2) At some point, some people might want to argue (or already have started arguing) that the types of distributions put together by college students in the 1990s (and since adjusted) are better than the types of distributions put together by high school teachers in the 1980s (and since adjusted) because they do a better job of measuring and teaching important knowledge. Part of this is the zillionth iteration of the computational tossups discussion, but that does not need to be the focus of the discussion, since there are other important differences. Any such discussions in this thread should be cognizant of the fact that in the end Brookwood will decide what their distribution is and that they have a long history of running high quality popular tournaments without your endorsement.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by at your pleasure »

First of all, I don't know how much "Social Studies" really reduces history since most of the Social studies classes I've had were glorified history classes with some random geography thrown in. In general, I agree with Andrew; Social Studies v.s. not social studies is not really a substantiative issue if it's clear what is considered social studies and how those sub-distributions are weighted(is it 4/4 history and 1/1 geo, 3/3 history and 2/2 misc. humanties, or something else?). The latter issue is where half the problems in this thread come from; once we know what exactly goes where, the distribution becomes imperfect but plausible. Nobody said "This distribution is a horrible abortion that should be taken out and shot', people (myself included) said "this seems to undervalue a few of the smaller academic subcategories".
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Mechanical Beasts »

Anti-Climacus wrote:First of all, I don't know how much "Social Studies" really reduces history since most of the Social studies classes I've had were glorified history classes with some random geography thrown in.
We're saying that in this distribution, "Social Studies" having "big three" weight like lit and science, instead of giving history "big three" weight like lit and science, gives less history since there are other categories in "Social Studies" in this distribution, which doesn't take into account your class schedule.

Mr. Reinstein, I appreciate the majority of your post, but
Shcool wrote:Any such discussions in this thread should be cognizant of the fact that in the end Brookwood will decide what their distribution is and that they have a long history of running high quality popular tournaments without your endorsement.
strikes the wrong chord for me. It sounds to me like you're saying "whatever you say, Brookwood will make its decision and be wildly successful." We're not debating whether people in Georgia like the distribution or enjoy attending the tournament, so we don't have any control over its success. And it's sort of silly to say "you might as well give up on talking, since they'll make their own decision." I mean, I think we're all aware that the distribution probably isn't going to change much according to our inquiries. This is about discussing what is good and bad about distributions; it just happens to have been catalyzed by a distributional philosophy that we haven't seen much of before.

But the very fact that they have a long history of running popular tournaments--with or without my personal endorsement--actually makes this all the more important a discussion. Is there a Georgia team that's never heard of Brookwood's tournament? It's unlikely. This distribution is very influential to the way that an entire state thinks about quizbowl. If it contained 2/2 jumping jacks, we'd be furious! It doesn't, thankfully, and since [what we perceive as] its flaws are mostly a matter of 3/3 here and there, it's not the sort of thing to get up in arms about. But that means that it is the sort of thing to discuss, because if there is a better distribution, whether more fair or more realistic or more appropriately in tune with the college game or the national game or something... then we owe it to ourselves to evangelize it a little.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Stained Diviner »

That's fair, Andrew. I was not trying to cut off debate, and I apologize if my post sounds that way. I agree that it is a valuable discussion, and I just wanted to put it in context.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by Mechanical Beasts »

Another valuable reading of what you said, Mr. Reinstein, is that Brookwood (not the quizbowl justice gods, or Haldor Laxness, or you or me) will be the one deciding on a distribution: and so if we desire their distribution to change, we should frame the issue solidly in terms of how they stand to benefit.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by jrbarry »

In my attempt to understand what this thread offshoot is really about, two things seem to stand out to me.

1. Had I used the term "history and social sciences" instead of "social studies," the contention by some here is that differeing terminology would have made my distribution more clear. I am interested in this because I would prefer having people understand what I was/am saying.

2. In the opinion of some on this board, our tournament's question formula seriously undervalues the aforementioned category whatever you want me to call it. I have some interest in this as well, but I must confess that the language used here to criticize our question formula is too extreme, in my opinion. Is it possible that we simply have a somewhat different view of what ought to be asked in a quiz bowl match than many on this board? Our view is not wrong or seriously flawed or over the top as has been suggested here. It is simply different but not so radically different as to pervert the activity hat we all like so much.

Good quiz bowl is big enough for some differences of opinion.

Fred: thanks for splitting off this thread.

Coach Reinstein: I appreciate your remarks. I wish more coaches would post on this board.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by AlphaQuizBowler »

jrbarry wrote: 1. Had I used the term "history and social sciences" instead of "social studies," the contention by some here is that differeing terminology would have made my distribution more clear. I am interested in this because I would prefer having people understand what I was/am saying.
I think that people (including myself), in the interest, as you said, of being more clear, would like you to go further and to assign a certain number of questions to history and a certain number to social sciences.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by jrbarry »

That post was made by me near the top of this original thread. Go to Regular Season Tournaments for that info.
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Re: Distribution of Brookwood Invitational Scholars Bowl

Post by at your pleasure »

Social studies is fine, as long as you are clear about what comes under the umbrella of social studies and state how that is weighted. If you had said "50/50 social studies, with a subistribution of 33/33 History, and 17/17 religion, philosophy, and social science"(just as one would state that x amount of the history is american, y amount is european, and z amount of world), it would be obvious to all that this is a mostly reasonable distribution with a few minor problems that could be fixed by moving about 2/2 or 3/3 per packet around.
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