Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

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Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Eddie » Sat Apr 23, 2016 2:56 pm

This is the general thread for discussion of the Imaginary Landscape No. 3 set. Thank you to the writing team: Jonathan Magin, Rebecca Maxfield, and myself; and the playtesting team: Will Alston, Auroni Gupta, Dan Klein, and Dave Letzler.

I don't think a separate thread for specific question discussion or error reports will be particularly necessary, so just post any and all of your thoughts here.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Eddie » Mon May 30, 2016 10:18 am

Because of the nature of the set, I obviously can't upload the questions themselves to this thread, but I'd be happy to provide a list of works / moments used in each TU upon request.

There'll also be a full list of works / composers for each TU released after all the mirrors.

EDIT: Also, if you directed any comments to me right after the tournament, I probably forgot everything you said so you'll need to re-state them here.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Unicolored Jay » Mon May 30, 2016 1:16 pm

This was awesome to play! Thanks for running it, Eddie, and big thanks to you, Jonathan, and Rebecca for writing it.

I kinda wish I was writing down things while playing the tournament so I'd have more thoughts, but here were some things I remember discussing post-tournament/my own observations, which may or may not have much basis (especially since a lot of tossups I heard never got to the last few clues):

-I thought the answer selections were quite good, especially the harder answerlines that seemed like they played well to the top players (except La Rondine, but maybe it was just our collective opera knowledge not being that good).
-A few notably important composers seemed conspicuously absent. I remember discussing the lack of Debussy, who wasn't represented at all outside of a few middle clues in common links? He was definitely the biggest example I can think of but there may have been one or two others.
-You mentioned the Richard Strauss tossup was written entirely using Tod und Verklarung clues, which helped it go dead amongst the playtesters. Out of curiosity, how did you construct this tossup?
-How much non-western music was represented in the set? This might be due to how the top room played out, but I don't remember hearing any of the sort, but I do believe this sort of tournament is a great place to ask about it.

Anyway, this was once again a very enjoyable set, and it was great to finally have a chance to play it!
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Eddie » Mon May 30, 2016 2:35 pm

Hi Jasper - congratulations again on your victory, and we're very happy to hear that you enjoyed the set.
Unicolored Jay wrote: -I thought the answer selections were quite good, especially the harder answerlines that seemed like they played well to the top players (except La Rondine, but maybe it was just our collective opera knowledge not being that good).
La rondine was one of the hardest opera questions in the set, along with Werther and Yeomen of the Guard. I did a hasty calculation just now, and on average, the field buzzed 15.65 seconds slower on opera questions compared to questions in other subjects, so I think you have a point about gaps in the field's collective opera knowledge.
Unicolored Jay wrote: -A few notably important composers seemed conspicuously absent. I remember discussing the lack of Debussy, who wasn't represented at all outside of a few middle clues in common links? He was definitely the biggest example I can think of but there may have been one or two others.
I think I mentioned this to you and Joe afterwards, but Debussy clues were present in the ocean tossup (using La mer), in the night tossup (using "Clair de lune"), and in the toccata tossup (using the toccata movement of Pour le piano). There wasn't a single individual tossup on Debussy or his music, but there was about a questions' worth of Debussy content spread out throughout the set. Joe also mentioned a lack of Copland - he was one of the emergency tiebreaker TUs, which I neglected to remember when we were discussing him Saturday night.
Unicolored Jay wrote: -You mentioned the Richard Strauss tossup was written entirely using Tod und Verklarung clues, which helped it go dead amongst the playtesters. Out of curiosity, how did you construct this tossup?
The Strauss tossup was originally a tossup on Tod und Verklarung itself, using the following six clues: this part, the "climax" of the third section (where you buzzed), the start of the second section, the very opening of the piece (the heartbeat motif), the "main" theme (the solo towards the beginning), and the "transfiguration" theme (which I'm having trouble locating the exact version I used). Because it went dead in playtesting and in the Canadian and U.K. mirrors, it was changed to a Strauss TU by cutting the lead-in and adding the "sunrise" motif from Also sprach Zarathustra as a giveaway.
Unicolored Jay wrote: -How much non-western music was represented in the set? This might be due to how the top room played out, but I don't remember hearing any of the sort, but I do believe this sort of tournament is a great place to ask about it.
Unfortunately, this set was rather limited in its world music distribution, which is mostly due to my lack of planning ahead, but Jonathan came up with a number of very good and creative ideas. The questions and clues I can recall right now are the Russia TU, which was composed entirely out of Russian folk songs (which aren't strictly part of the Western canon), the Argentina TU, which used various tango clues towards the end, and the Australia, which used clues on didgeridoo music.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Ben Salter » Mon May 30, 2016 3:55 pm

I’ve been busy for the past few weeks so haven’t had time to post about this, but I just want to take a moment to thank Eddie and the crew for putting together a polished, very enjoyable tournament. I think everyone at the UK site enjoyed it greatly, and it’s definitely the most fun I’ve had playing quizbowl.

I thought the vast majority of the questions had well-chosen answer lines with good pyramidal clues. The only exception that I can remember is the Karl Jenkins tossup, which was gotten after around 1 second in both rooms. I feel like the Benedictus from The Armed Man is extremely famous (I think that was the first clue?); I would put it up there with Palladio and Adiemus in terms of fame, and certainly above the rest of The Armed Man and his Requiem, which I believe is from where the rest of the clues were taken (Benedictus was 15th in the 2016 Classic FM Hall of Fame, whereas Adiemus and Palladio were 121st and 124th respectively, not that that’s necessarily a good metric). I’d be interested to hear how this question played in other rooms - it could definitely be the case that I have a skewed view of what Jenkins pieces are famous.

I really liked some of the specific prompt instructions like those on the Partita and String Quintet questions, which were buzzed in with “chaconne” and “minuet” respectively (I assume there were specific instructions for this and it wasn’t just the moderators improvising). I haven’t really seen such prompts in regular quizbowl (other than just saying “antiprompt”), and it’d be interesting to see if they can carry over in some way.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by magin » Mon May 30, 2016 4:14 pm

Ben,

Glad you liked the tournament. I wrote the Karl Jenkins tossup, I apologize for the Benedictus clue causing a huge buzzer race; I didn't think it was famous, and during playtesting, no one answered the tossup until the Palladio clues. Certainly would have put it later if I thought that might happen.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Eddie » Mon May 30, 2016 5:13 pm

Ben Salter wrote:I’d be interested to hear how this question played in other rooms - it could definitely be the case that I have a skewed view of what Jenkins pieces are famous.
In the finals at the HSNCT site, it was buzzed at 0:43 (the first Palladio clue), with nobody appearing to recognize or place the earlier clues (though, one player commented afterwards that he recognized the "L'homme armé" melody in the second clue).
Ben Salter wrote: I really liked some of the specific prompt instructions like those on the Partita and String Quintet questions, which were buzzed in with “chaconne” and “minuet” respectively (I assume there were specific instructions for this and it wasn’t just the moderators improvising). I haven’t really seen such prompts in regular quizbowl (other than just saying “antiprompt”), and it’d be interesting to see if they can carry over in some way.
Jacob Reed also did that style of specific prompts / antiprompts in MYSTERIUM and BHSAT this year and last, which is where I got the idea. I'd like to see it carry over in some fashion as well.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Benin Rebirth Party » Tue May 31, 2016 6:32 pm

I LOVED THIS SET (as well as other Landscapes). Thanks Eddie, Rebecca, and Jon for making this and congrats to Jasper for winning.

Some questions and comments:
- I did not like the inclusion of multiple trash tossups in a single round (No offense, Saul)
- IIRC, the only question which the leadin was a buzzer race within the top room was Rite of Spring. The leadin to Rach and the early placement of Shosty 9 were two other clues that may have been placed too early. These buzzer races are unfortunate but you can't really prevent them without making the leadin completely ungettable.
- Some composers did lack exposure. Many of it would be because we all collectively buzzed in so early on a lot of the common-link questions (e.g. we heard like 2 seconds worth of Chopin, Debussy, Saint-Saens, Rach, and some others). Was there any...big named Handel pieces in the set?
- The finals room missing Fidelio is kinda embarrassing. I think something from the actually named Fidelio overture could have made it easier, I probably would have gotten it.
- I'm not musically educated and don't know why "Kyrie" is a text but "Magnificat" is a genre.
- How much exposure to Clementi do kids taking piano lessons get in America? What difficulty grading was that tossup? Along that lines, will difficulty levels be provided for each tossup when you post the set?
- Despite helping me get lots of questions, I thought there was a lot of Mozart and Beethoven in the set (At least six of each on just themselves and not part of a common link), whose slots could have been used to ask about some of the less-asked composers.
- The opera distro seemed to lack some Verdi.

More of a selfish question here - how did the set play out to the top room in your opinion?

This set sacrificed canon for trash and ungettable stuff. I didn't like it personally, but doesn't take away from it being an fun experience. Still tied with two (2) other sets as the most fun I've had playing :wink:
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Eddie » Tue May 31, 2016 7:13 pm

raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote: - I did not like the inclusion of multiple trash tossups in a single round (No offense, Saul)
The questions in the "popular" category were: summer, Marshall Mathers LP, Who's Next, Bo Diddley, Revolver, Iron Maiden, Bad, and Sandy Denny. The tossups on Guthrie, Twin Peaks, and moon were placed under the "miscellaneous" category, and musicals and films each had their own category, if you consider those to be trash. Was there a particular reason you didn't agree with the distribution, and what would you recommend as a solution?
raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote: - IIRC, the only question which the leadin was a buzzer race within the top room was Rite of Spring. The leadin to Rach and the early placement of Shosty 9 were two other clues that may have been placed too early. These buzzer races are unfortunate but you can't really prevent them without making the leadin completely ungettable.
The Rachmaninoff and Rite of Spring tossups have both been fixed. I don't think the Shostakovich symphonies TU is really one where you can find a better clue, since he has a very distinctive sound, and most of his symphonies are very famous, but I would be happy to hear suggestions.
raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote: - Some composers did lack exposure. Many of it would be because we all collectively buzzed in so early on a lot of the common-link questions (e.g. we heard like 2 seconds worth of Chopin, Debussy, Saint-Saens, Rach, and some others). Was there any...big named Handel pieces in the set?
There was a tossup on Handel (Cuckoo and the Nightingale Concerto, passacaglia from Harpsichord Suite No. 7, "The Harmonious Blacksmith," Zadok the Priest, "The Arrival of the Queen of Sheba," and the "Hallelujah" chorus). The tossup on Egypt incorporated three Handel clues ("Va tacito" from Julius Caesar, "The ways of Zion do mourn," and the "Hailstone" chorus from Israel in Egypt). A lot of under-exposed composers also had to do with relative over-exposure in previous Imaginary Landscapes (for example, the first two sets collectively had two tossups on Handel, two tossups on Messiah, one tossup on Water Music, and one tossup on Music for the Royal Fireworks).
raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote: - The finals room missing Fidelio is kinda embarrassing. I think something from the actually named Fidelio overture could have made it easier, I probably would have gotten it.
You mentioned this to me Saturday night, but I forgot the specifics of what you told me, sorry. Can you link me a video from YouTube or something with a good clue?
raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote: I'm not musically educated and don't know why "Kyrie" is a text but "Magnificat" is a genre.
At least in quizbowl, I think that "genre" is a rather loosely defined term, and I wanted to avoid confusion because four of the clues in the Kyrie tossup came from masses, one from a requiem, and one from Gregorian chant. The Magnificat tossup, on the other hand, clued entirely from complete settings of the Magnificat. Again, I would be happy to hear better suggestions here too.
raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote: - How much exposure to Clementi do kids taking piano lessons get in America? What difficulty grading was that tossup? Along that lines, will difficulty levels be provided for each tossup when you post the set?
Clementi was graded as 5 (on a 1 through 6 scale). We can certainly publish difficulty levels when we post the set, along with a catalogue of works and clues.
raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote: - Despite helping me get lots of questions, I thought there was a lot of Mozart and Beethoven in the set (At least six of each on just themselves and not part of a common link), whose slots could have been used to ask about some of the less-asked composers.
raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote: - The opera distro seemed to lack some Verdi.
There was a TU on Verdi, a TU on La forza del destino, and a TU on Egypt that incorporated three clues from Aida. This was a little less than the amount of Puccini (Tosca, Madama Butterfly, and La rondine), and a little more than the amount of Wagner (Die Walküre and The Flying Dutchman).
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Your Genie Felon, Me » Thu Jun 02, 2016 9:35 am

Just curious, what was the clue placement for the Revolver tossup? I buzzed at the firstline around 2 seconds in on Doctor Robert and thought it was very easy, but to be honest, now that I think about it there's no song on that album that isn't super recognizable immediately if you have listened to it all so I'm hard pressed for another suggestion for a leadin. If I had a choice, I would use Love You To as a leadin, but that's just because I haven't listened to that song out of the whole album that much - I have no idea how famous it actually is as a Beatles song.

Also, I'd like to take this opportunity to thank and congratulate the writing team on a really great set - the tournament was honestly my favorite part of the whole weekend. :D

EDIT: Also, what was the clue placement for moon? I thought using How High The Moon as a second line was pretty easy, considering how famous it is as a standard.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by jonpin » Sun Jun 05, 2016 10:28 am

Even as someone who did predictably terribly, this was a mostly-enjoyable experience. I liked one of my students saying (more than once), "Oh, so that's what that sounds like" or "I wrote a tossup on that piece without ever having actually heard it".

One question: Round 1, Tossup 2, on France. There was a big, I-wanna-say brassy piece (I enjoy music--though primarily pop--but am AWFUL at describing it), that made me neg with United Kingdom, thinking it was a theme song some network had used for Wimbledon or something like that. What were the parts of that (so what might I be thinking of?)
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by dwd500 » Sun Jun 05, 2016 10:58 am

This was just great to play.
raffi_-_c-a-n-a-d-a.mp3 wrote:- I'm not musically educated and don't know why "Kyrie" is a text but "Magnificat" is a genre.
The only thing I can really think of is that you almost never see a Kyrie published as a stand-alone work, but you do see several Magnificats done as such. Same for Stabat Maters, Te Deums, Regina Coelis, etc. However, there's a bunch of "Sanctus"es that undercut that argument

I spotted the Armed Man theme, but that threw me WAY off track. It was a very popular theme for some early masses (Dufay, Josquin, etc.) but that was obviously not an example from that time period. I had never heard of Jenkins prior to this.

Were you trying to represent a certain percentage of clues from different performing ensembles? (Orchestra, Choir, Piano-centric, etc.) It seemed, especially in the early parts of the final, to tilt towards the Orchestral side.

I understand the thinking on leading the Rachmaninoff with the Vespers (and in particular Bogoroditse Devo) led to an early buzz in the other room, as well. Most people are exposed to Rach via his piano works and concertos, so leading with his choral stuff would be harder. That movement in particular, though, is a big standard in the high school/college repertoire. I don't know any choral musician that hasn't heard the Shaw recording at least a dozen times. Now that you say it's fixed, I'm anxious to hear it again.

Speaking of the choral side, again, THANK YOU for the Durufle question. He's massively important for us, but so little-known outside vocal circles he feels like our pet secret composer. He never comes up. I have to move onto a new dream composer to get asked about: Frank Martin and the Mass for Double Choir.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Unicolored Jay » Sun Jun 05, 2016 11:51 am

jonpin wrote:Even as someone who did predictably terribly, this was a mostly-enjoyable experience. I liked one of my students saying (more than once), "Oh, so that's what that sounds like" or "I wrote a tossup on that piece without ever having actually heard it".

One question: Round 1, Tossup 2, on France. There was a big, I-wanna-say brassy piece (I enjoy music--though primarily pop--but am AWFUL at describing it), that made me neg with United Kingdom, thinking it was a theme song some network had used for Wimbledon or something like that. What were the parts of that (so what might I be thinking of?)
If I remember correctly the clue was the Rondeau by Jean-Joseph Mouret, who was actually French.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Nicklausse/Muse » Sun Jun 05, 2016 12:10 pm

dwd500 wrote:Speaking of the choral side, again, THANK YOU for the Durufle question. He's massively important for us, but so little-known outside vocal circles he feels like our pet secret composer. He never comes up.
Wooo! (When did you buzz?)
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by dwd500 » Sun Jun 05, 2016 1:17 pm

I was thinking it during the organ section, but recognized the Kyrie. Took a stab at that point because, just..., I had to.

Tell me that tossup ends in the Sanctus...
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Nicklausse/Muse » Sun Jun 05, 2016 3:02 pm

No, there was another Requiem excerpt (Pie Jesu) and two motet clues
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by magin » Sun Jun 05, 2016 5:01 pm

I thought Eddie Kim did a great job as head editor for this set, and I think it's as good, if not better, than the first two Imaginary Landscapes. Eddie and Rebecca wrote almost all of the classical music/opera for this set, although I contributed the tossups on Borodin, Ives, Karl Jenkins, Lyric Pieces, and overtures.

I was also responsible for the film, the jazz, the musicals tossups on Guys and Dolls, Bye Bye Birdie, The Pajama Game, and Hairspray, the nationality tossups on Argentina, Russia, and Scotland, the pop music tossups on Who's Next, Bo Diddley, and songs about summer, and the miscellaneous tossups on Woody Guthrie, galops, and the moon (mostly from standards).

If anyone has any feedback about my questions, I'd be happy to hear it and/or address any questions of why tossups were constructed in a particular way.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by jonpin » Sun Jun 05, 2016 5:20 pm

Unicolored Jay wrote:
jonpin wrote:Even as someone who did predictably terribly, this was a mostly-enjoyable experience. I liked one of my students saying (more than once), "Oh, so that's what that sounds like" or "I wrote a tossup on that piece without ever having actually heard it".

One question: Round 1, Tossup 2, on France. There was a big, I-wanna-say brassy piece (I enjoy music--though primarily pop--but am AWFUL at describing it), that made me neg with United Kingdom, thinking it was a theme song some network had used for Wimbledon or something like that. What were the parts of that (so what might I be thinking of?)
If I remember correctly the clue was the Rondeau by Jean-Joseph Mouret, who was actually French.
Ah, it's the theme to Masterpiece Theatre, which may explain why I had associated it with Britain.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by dwd500 » Sun Jun 05, 2016 6:02 pm

magin wrote: the miscellaneous tossups on Woody Guthrie.
What all were the clues in this one? We were looking for the lyricist, right?

That tossup had the room in knots. I was thinking Guthrie the whole time, but I finally risked the neg on This Land is Your Land because I was pretty sure he had a hand in writing that, as well as singing it. I knew he's given credit on it, anyway.

Had to look that up. I(and apparently most of the room) didn't know that it was a pre-existing tune.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by magin » Sun Jun 05, 2016 7:22 pm

dwd500 wrote:
magin wrote: the miscellaneous tossups on Woody Guthrie.
What all were the clues in this one? We were looking for the lyricist, right?

That tossup had the room in knots. I was thinking Guthrie the whole time, but I finally risked the neg on This Land is Your Land because I was pretty sure he had a hand in writing that, as well as singing it. I knew he's given credit on it, anyway.

Had to look that up. I(and apparently most of the room) didn't know that it was a pre-existing tune.
That tossup went "Shipping Up to Boston," "Deportee," "Pretty Boy Floyd," "Do Re Mi," "All You Fascists Bound to Lose," "This Land is Your Land."
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Eddie » Sun Jun 05, 2016 9:37 pm

Your Feline Genome wrote:Just curious, what was the clue placement for the Revolver tossup? I buzzed at the firstline around 2 seconds in on Doctor Robert and thought it was very easy, but to be honest, now that I think about it there's no song on that album that isn't super recognizable immediately if you have listened to it all so I'm hard pressed for another suggestion for a leadin. If I had a choice, I would use Love You To as a leadin, but that's just because I haven't listened to that song out of the whole album that much - I have no idea how famous it actually is as a Beatles song.
"Doctor Robert," I Want to Tell You," "Love You To," "Here, There and Everywhere," "Tomorrow Never Knows," "Eleanor Rigby."
Your Feline Genome wrote: EDIT: Also, what was the clue placement for moon? I thought using How High The Moon as a second line was pretty easy, considering how famous it is as a standard.
"By the Light of the Silvery Moon," "How High the Moon," "It's Only a Paper Moon," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Bad Moon Rising," "Blue Moon"
jonpin wrote:One question: Round 1, Tossup 2, on France. There was a big, I-wanna-say brassy piece (I enjoy music--though primarily pop--but am AWFUL at describing it), that made me neg with United Kingdom, thinking it was a theme song some network had used for Wimbledon or something like that. What were the parts of that (so what might I be thinking of?)
As Jasper said, it's Jean-Joseph Mouret's Fanfare-Rondeau. The next clue is Marc-Antoine Charpentier's Te Deum, which is also famous in television as the theme music to Eurovision.
dwd500 wrote:This was just great to play.
Were you trying to represent a certain percentage of clues from different performing ensembles? (Orchestra, Choir, Piano-centric, etc.) It seemed, especially in the early parts of the final, to tilt towards the Orchestral side.
As explained in the original tournament announcement, each round used a set distribution of subcategories. The "composer" category probably introduced the widest possible range of variability, but in Round 6, the category distribution (at least among the classical genres) was:

Composers: Jenkins, Saint-Saens, Schumann, Chopin, Ysaye, Verdi
Orchestral: Brahms 1, Beethoven PC 4, Bruckner 8
Choral / Dance / Opera: Magnificat, Werther, Don Giovanni
Keyboard: Lyric Pieces
Chamber: Night
Country: Scotland
dwd500 wrote:I understand the thinking on leading the Rachmaninoff with the Vespers (and in particular Bogoroditse Devo) led to an early buzz in the other room, as well. Most people are exposed to Rach via his piano works and concertos, so leading with his choral stuff would be harder. That movement in particular, though, is a big standard in the high school/college repertoire. I don't know any choral musician that hasn't heard the Shaw recording at least a dozen times. Now that you say it's fixed, I'm anxious to hear it again.
In playtesting, Dave Letzler did recommend moving the Vespers clue later, so I apologize for the rather misplaced clue. The new lead-in I chose was the third movement of his cello sonata.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by gimmedatguudsuccrose » Mon Jun 06, 2016 11:43 am

I already mentioned this to Eddie, but the first clues of both the Tchaikovsky tossup (the Rococo Variations) and the Sibelius Violin Concerto were a bit early, both causing massive buzzer races at the NSC site.

Ysaye was an interesting idea for a tossup, although I'm not certain that there was a way to do it in a non-transparent manner.

Overall, I loved playing this set!
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Evan Lynch » Mon Jun 06, 2016 1:28 pm

Leading in with Land of the Mountain and the Flood for the Scotland tossup was majestic - excellent choice, even if I did spend the rest of the question in a rage trying to remember what it was.

On another note, I was disappointed that the set didn't include anything from brass bands, though I imagine they're less of a thing in the US rather than Europe. I only got a couple buzzes from my brass band knowledge (including The Force of Destiny, as the overture for that is infinitely more fabulous when arranged for band).

All round it was pretty great - the odd pyramidality issue (Jenkins was already mentioned, but I won the buzzer race so it's fine), though I felt that the contemporary distribution swung too much towards the sixties.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Eddie » Sun Jun 19, 2016 1:05 am

Now that the last mirror of Imaginary Landscape No. 3 has concluded, here are links to a bunch of stuff that people have been asking about. Thanks again to everyone for playing this tournament.

The set can be downloaded at this Box link.

The list of clues can be found at this Google Drive link. Each row is organized from lead-in (on the far left) to giveaway (on the far right). I've tried to provide as specific information as possible (e.g. movement numbers), but left a number of them blank because it would be impossible to cleanly describe six individual moments from a short piece such as Night on Bald Mountain.

Detailed individual and conversion statistics for the HSNCT site and the NSC site can be found at those respective links.

Please contact me if there are any issues.
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Re: Imaginary Landscape No. 3 Discussion

Post by Cheynem » Wed Jun 29, 2016 6:41 pm

This was a fantastic set and lots of fun. The film was, as per usual, magnificent. I'd like to at some point to do an all-film (and TV, I guess) version of this set.
Mike Cheyne
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