2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Milhouse » Mon Nov 21, 2016 6:59 pm

This section of a holy text recalls how the angels were ordered to prostrate before Adam, which Iblis, the Devil, refused to do.
This also occurs in at least Al-Kahf (at 18:50), though at less length.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Amizda Calyx » Mon Nov 21, 2016 9:09 pm

sarangyeola wrote:
Amizda Calyx wrote:The bio in this set was good! I don't think I have any errata, although I'd like to see the insulin tossup since I think I remember a PTEN clue that confused me.
The PTEN clue was in the thyroid tossup:
Terrapin, Packet 11, question 19 wrote: Cancer in the prostate, breasts, uterus, and this structure can be caused by mutations in PTEN. That mutation is the main indicator of Cowden syndrome, which increases the risk of cancers like Hürthle cell carcinoma in this structure. A peroxidase named for this structure creates modified tyrosine residues and can be inhibited by propyl·thio·uracil or methimazole. People with low function of this structure are treated with (*) Synthroid. One autoimmune disorder of this organ often presents with inflamed and bulging eyeballs. Patients with Down syndrome often overproduce TSH to compensate for this gland’s underproduction of T3 and T4. Enlargement of this gland due to an iodine deficiency is called goiter. For 10 points, name this endocrine gland in the neck.
ANSWER: thyroid gland (The autoimmune disorder is Graves’ disease.)
But here's also the insulin tossup for good measure:
Terrapin, Packet 9, question 9 wrote:This protein is found in the controversial GIK infusion used to treat acute myocardial infarctions. It’s not Wnt, but the binding of this protein to its receptor triggers a PI-3 kinase-based signaling pathway that deactivates GSK3. The primary ligands of this protein’s associated receptor tyrosine kinase are this compound and two growth factors that have a similar structure to this protein, whose precursor form consists of A and B chains connected by the (*) C-peptide. Frederick Sanger won a Nobel Prize for sequencing this hormone, which indirectly stimulates glycogen production. Glucagon opposes this hormone, which is secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas. For 10 points, the release of glucose from blood to tissues is promoted by what hormone whose deficiency causes diabetes?
ANSWER: insulin
Oh right, same pathway, just got confused which was used for which tossup (I remembered suspecting uniqueness issues in some PI3K-related thing and in some PTEN-related thing and must have combined them).
For insulin: The second clue is ambiguous -- wouldn't a lot of growth factors binding to their receptors induce GSK3 inactivation? I certainly learned about this mechanism in a lecture on insulin, but delayed buzzing on GSK3 (which, by the way, is the only remotely buzzable word in that sentence even if it was unique) since I had also seen it in other pathways.

As for the PTEN clue, that is definitely not unique either, and the same goes for the Cowden clue up until "Hurthle". I would stay away from linking mutations in such a ubiquitous protein to any single organ cancer.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Bloodwych » Mon Nov 21, 2016 9:51 pm

Can you post the bacillus/anthrax/protein folding bonus?
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Cherrybell Miramonte » Tue Nov 22, 2016 1:02 am

Bloodwych wrote:Can you post the bacillus/anthrax/protein folding bonus?
Terrapin packet 12 wrote:This genus’s amyloliquefaciens species produces the enzyme barnase, which is known for its extremely tight binding with its inhibitor barstar. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria. Its subtilis species is found in soil and its cereus species causes food poisoning in fried rice that’s been sitting out too long.
ANSWER: Bacillus [accept Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus cereus]
[10] Another species of Bacillus causes this disease, which is spread by contact with spores. In a 2001 incident, the spores that cause this disease were spread through the mail.
ANSWER: anthrax [accept Bacillus anthracis]
[10] Alan Fersht and Satoshi Sato used barnase to study this process using phi value analysis. The theory of “hydrophobic collapse” can explain this process, which is used to form amyloid plaques.
ANSWER: protein folding [or polypeptide folding; prompt on folding]
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Bloodwych » Tue Nov 22, 2016 2:17 am

Magtymguly Pyragy wrote:
Bloodwych wrote:Can you post the bacillus/anthrax/protein folding bonus?
Terrapin packet 12 wrote:This genus’s amyloliquefaciens species produces the enzyme barnase, which is known for its extremely tight binding with its inhibitor barstar. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria. Its subtilis species is found in soil and its cereus species causes food poisoning in fried rice that’s been sitting out too long.
ANSWER: Bacillus [accept Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus cereus]
[10] Another species of Bacillus causes this disease, which is spread by contact with spores. In a 2001 incident, the spores that cause this disease were spread through the mail.
ANSWER: anthrax [accept Bacillus anthracis]
[10] Alan Fersht and Satoshi Sato used barnase to study this process using phi value analysis. The theory of “hydrophobic collapse” can explain this process, which is used to form amyloid plaques.
ANSWER: protein folding [or polypeptide folding; prompt on folding]
Alright, I said something like "agglomeration" for the third part (I think I meant aggregation) and didn't get any points, as it was my understanding that amyloid plaques are made of clumps of misfolded proteins. It was a little bit unclear. In any case, I don't think the first clue applied to aggregation at all.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Amizda Calyx » Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:23 pm

Terrapin packet 12 wrote:This genus’s amyloliquefaciens species produces the enzyme barnase, which is known for its extremely tight binding with its inhibitor barstar. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria. Its subtilis species is found in soil and its cereus species causes food poisoning in fried rice that’s been sitting out too long.
ANSWER: Bacillus [accept Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus cereus]
[10] Another species of Bacillus causes this disease, which is spread by contact with spores. In a 2001 incident, the spores that cause this disease were spread through the mail.
ANSWER: anthrax [accept Bacillus anthracis]
[10] Alan Fersht and Satoshi Sato used barnase to study this process using phi value analysis. The theory of “hydrophobic collapse” can explain this process, which is used to form amyloid plaques.
ANSWER: protein folding [or polypeptide folding; prompt on folding]
Yeah, I'm not a fan of the wording in that bonus part. I'd just get rid of that clue altogether since it's not really the folding that's forming the amyloid plaques so much as defects in folding and their (Chris would be correct here) "agglomeration". Also hydrophobic collapse is a hypothesis.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Amizda Calyx » Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:42 pm

Also, can I see the tossup on Antigone? I think I heard the pronoun for the leadin as "this play" and despite remembering that particular Eurydice anachronism I got really confused thinking "no way would they toss up Anouilh's Antigone, this must be from something else" and waited until it mentioned something about an updated version.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Jem Casey » Wed Nov 23, 2016 9:30 pm

Amizda Calyx wrote:Also, can I see the tossup on Antigone? I think I heard the pronoun for the leadin as "this play" and despite remembering that particular Eurydice anachronism I got really confused thinking "no way would they toss up Anouilh's Antigone, this must be from something else" and waited until it mentioned something about an updated version.
A version of this play adds an argument with a nurse over the dog Puff and a woman who sits knitting sweaters throughout the play before going to her room to kill herself. Upon entering, a character in this play gives a speech beginning “My countrymen, the ship of state is safe.” In this play, a sentry describes seeing a mysterious whirlwind, and then catching sight of the (*) protagonist after the dust settles. In both this play and the update of it written by Jean Anouilh (“ah-NOO-ee”) during the Vichy regime, Haemon stabs himself after finding the hanging body of the protagonist in a cavelike tomb. In this play, Ismene’s sister violates the orders of Creon by performing burial rites for Polyneices. For 10 points, name this Sophocles play titled for the daughter of Oedipus.
ANSWER: Antigone
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by gerbilownage » Thu Dec 01, 2016 1:40 pm

Although I liked the drama in general, the Picnic tossup was exceedingly difficult. Everything up to "getting drunk on a man's whisky" could easily be lead-in lines, and were somewhat random lines from the play unconnected with the main plot.

I appreciated the mention of Caryl Churchill, though--always good to see contemporary playwrights in the literature mix.
1. A character in this play once had to sit through a coronation ceremony after the Chamber of Commerce
named her “Queen of Neewollah.” A character in this play exclaims “pictures don’t have to be pretty!” when
another character criticizes the pictures by Picasso that she hangs over her bed. A character in this play tells
a newspaper boy to “go blow your nose” after he flirts with her sister and later throws up after getting drunk
on a man’s whisky. That character, (*) Howard, is forced into marrying the school teacher Rosemary Sydney in
this play. This play ends with Madge Owens running after the train on which Hal Carter escaped from police. For 10
points, name this play that takes place on Labor Day in a midwestern town set around the title event by William
Inge
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Jem Casey » Thu Dec 01, 2016 6:37 pm

gerbilownage wrote:Although I liked the drama in general, the Picnic tossup was exceedingly difficult. Everything up to "getting drunk on a man's whisky" could easily be lead-in lines, and were somewhat random lines from the play unconnected with the main plot.

I appreciated the mention of Caryl Churchill, though--always good to see contemporary playwrights in the literature mix.
1. A character in this play once had to sit through a coronation ceremony after the Chamber of Commerce
named her “Queen of Neewollah.” A character in this play exclaims “pictures don’t have to be pretty!” when
another character criticizes the pictures by Picasso that she hangs over her bed. A character in this play tells
a newspaper boy to “go blow your nose” after he flirts with her sister and later throws up after getting drunk
on a man’s whisky. That character, (*) Howard, is forced into marrying the school teacher Rosemary Sydney in
this play. This play ends with Madge Owens running after the train on which Hal Carter escaped from police. For 10
points, name this play that takes place on Labor Day in a midwestern town set around the title event by William
Inge
Yeah, sorry about that. My original plan was to read Picnic before editing this tossup, but, not actually wanting to read Picnic, I waited too long to get a copy and only had time to make some superficial edits. The first half will be made easier for future mirrors.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Progcon » Wed Dec 07, 2016 1:25 am

Can I see the tossup on English workers or whatever the exact answerline was? A teammate negged with "Proletariat" and didn't know what to say after being prompted. I was thinking just like "factory worker in England" right before he buzzed.

Also:
According to the Greenwald–Stiglitz theorem, markets will not satisfy this condition so long as there is imperfect information, or the market is incomplete. In a certain diagram, this condition is satisfied at the points where the indifference curves for two agents intersect tangentially; that diagram, the Edgeworth box, can be used to draw the contract curve. By taking into account the possibility of (*) compensations, Kaldor and Hicks introduced a more general form of this condition. This condition is satisfied in a competitive equilibrium according to the first fundamental theorem of welfare economics. For 10 points, name this condition in which there exists no alternative allocation of resources that would make someone better off without making someone else worse off.
ANSWER: _Pareto optimality_ [or _Pareto efficiency_; accept other word forms]
This is way too easy in my opinion. I learned about everything after the first clue in my more-or-less intermediate micro course. The Edgeworth box is super famous for featuring Pareto efficiency and indifference curves can logically only intersect tangentially in the context of an Edgeworth box or else the assumptions of an indifference curve would be violated. I personally feel Kaldor and Hicks are harder clues than Edgeworth box and I was shocked to learn I powered this tossup at "Edgeworth".

I'm sorry if this sounds nitpicky. This set was great overall but I thought this tossup was too easy.

I also thought the exchange rate bonus was very strange. I'd like to know the conversion rate on the bonus part on the trilemma of exchange rates because giving that answer was really hard. I was prompted a few times but I was able to give an answer. The trilemma is important because fixed exchange rates are relevant to countries like Denmark so I'm fine with asking about it, but it was a hard pull and answer to give. I'm in an international economics class now so I 30d that bonus but it was pretty goofy to have the Tobin Tax show up. I study taxation and I feel that there are many more interesting taxes to write about than a proposed one on financial transactions. There are lot of interesting information about taxes on foreign corporate income taxation that are serious issues in tax policy that researchers study. I also own 4 books on tax so I'm just kind of tired of the same taxes coming up.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Periplus of the Erythraean Sea » Wed Dec 07, 2016 9:44 am

Progcon wrote:Can I see the tossup on English workers or whatever the exact answerline was? A teammate negged with "Proletariat" and didn't know what to say after being prompted. I was thinking just like "factory worker in England" right before he buzzed.

Also:
According to the Greenwald–Stiglitz theorem, markets will not satisfy this condition so long as there is imperfect information, or the market is incomplete. In a certain diagram, this condition is satisfied at the points where the indifference curves for two agents intersect tangentially; that diagram, the Edgeworth box, can be used to draw the contract curve. By taking into account the possibility of (*) compensations, Kaldor and Hicks introduced a more general form of this condition. This condition is satisfied in a competitive equilibrium according to the first fundamental theorem of welfare economics. For 10 points, name this condition in which there exists no alternative allocation of resources that would make someone better off without making someone else worse off.
ANSWER: _Pareto optimality_ [or _Pareto efficiency_; accept other word forms]
This is way too easy in my opinion. I learned about everything after the first clue in my more-or-less intermediate micro course. The Edgeworth box is super famous for featuring Pareto efficiency and indifference curves can logically only intersect tangentially in the context of an Edgeworth box or else the assumptions of an indifference curve would be violated. I personally feel Kaldor and Hicks are harder clues than Edgeworth box and I was shocked to learn I powered this tossup at "Edgeworth".

I'm sorry if this sounds nitpicky. This set was great overall but I thought this tossup was too easy.

I also thought the exchange rate bonus was very strange. I'd like to know the conversion rate on the bonus part on the trilemma of exchange rates because giving that answer was really hard. I was prompted a few times but I was able to give an answer. The trilemma is important because fixed exchange rates are relevant to countries like Denmark so I'm fine with asking about it, but it was a hard pull and answer to give. I'm in an international economics class now so I 30d that bonus but it was pretty goofy to have the Tobin Tax show up. I study taxation and I feel that there are many more interesting taxes to write about than a proposed one on financial transactions. There are lot of interesting information about taxes on foreign corporate income taxation that are serious issues in tax policy that researchers study. I also own 4 books on tax so I'm just kind of tired of the same taxes coming up.
Dude, I've been getting 15 points at regular difficulty from stuff I learned in intermediate micro and macro ever since freshman year. It's not a big deal - you take classes, you learn things. The Edgeworth box clue is in the right place in this tossup - I agree with you that it's a bit easy when compared with some of the other questions, but this variability isn't like too extreme.

I will agree that the trilemma bonus part is pretty hard to pull on the fly - I covered the same exact material in class, but I couldn't pull it because I haven't taken that class in 4 years and that's the kind of thing you usually need to have relatively fresh in your mind. That said, science questions that do this sort of thing are a great way to go even if they are really tough for people who haven't done the math or taken the classes, and this stuff is core enough that I think it can be defended as a hard part.

Also, you're right about Tobin taxes - they come up a lot, probably because they're a Named Thing. There are indeed many more important taxes you can write about, and people should probably do that. The issue, of course, is that writing social science in a way that's uniquely identifying can be really hard. I wouldn't give Weijia too much crap for playing it safe during his first crack at writing economics for an important college tournament.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by wcheng » Wed Dec 07, 2016 9:53 am

Hey Harris, as the guy who wrote the econ for this set, I'd be happy to comment on your concerns.
This is way too easy in my opinion. I learned about everything after the first clue in my more-or-less intermediate micro course. The Edgeworth box is super famous for featuring Pareto efficiency and indifference curves can logically only intersect tangentially in the context of an Edgeworth box or else the assumptions of an indifference curve would be violated. I personally feel Kaldor and Hicks are harder clues than Edgeworth box and I was shocked to learn I powered this tossup at "Edgeworth".
So here's this tossup after I edited it in response to Corry's comments, which I assume is the version of the tossup that you played. (It may not have been, depending on which site you played the set)
According to the Greenwald–Stiglitz theorem, markets will not satisfy this condition so long as there is imperfect information, or the market is incomplete. It’s not equilibrium, but the set of points that satisfy this condition in the interior of the Edgeworth box is known as the contract curve. Amartya Sen demonstrated that this condition was incompatible with “minimal liberalism” in his “liberal paradox.” By taking into account the possibility of (*) compensations, Kaldor and Hicks introduced a more general form of this condition. This condition is satisfied in a competitive equilibrium according to the first fundamental theorem of welfare economics. For 10 points, name this condition in which there exists no alternative allocation of resources that would make someone better off without making someone else worse off.
ANSWER: Pareto optimality [or Pareto efficiency; accept other word forms]
I think that this version of the tossup makes the answer a bit less obvious. In any case, I think that while the fact that Edgeworth boxes feature Pareto optimality is important, it's still a reasonable early clue for a question because it's not as well known within the context of quizbowl, especially since not everyone is an economics major. I think it's good that you were able to get this question early, since I think it indicates that this question was answerable with academic knowledge that a quizbowler could be reasonably expected to have. Kaldor-Hicks efficiency was placed later in the question because it is what I would call a "named thing" that has appeared frequently in clues about Pareto optimality, which I think many people have learned simply through reading packets.
I also thought the exchange rate bonus was very strange. I'd like to know the conversion rate on the bonus part on the trilemma of exchange rates because giving that answer was really hard. I was prompted a few times but I was able to give an answer. The trilemma is important because fixed exchange rates are relevant to countries like Denmark so I'm fine with asking about it, but it was a hard pull and answer to give. I'm in an international economics class now so I 30d that bonus but it was pretty goofy to have the Tobin Tax show up. I study taxation and I feel that there are many more interesting taxes to write about than a proposed one on financial transactions. There are lot of interesting information about taxes on foreign corporate income taxation that are serious issues in tax policy that researchers study. I also own 4 books on tax so I'm just kind of tired of the same taxes coming up.
The “spot” variant of this quantity is quoted for an immediate transaction, whereas the “forward” variant of this quantity is quoted for a transaction that will take place sometime in the future. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this quantity that is the price of a country’s currency in terms of another country’s currency.
ANSWER: foreign exchange rate [or forex rate]
[10] Two answers required. Under the Mundell–Fleming model, a country cannot simultaneously pursue a fixed exchange rate and these two other members of the impossible trinity, also known as the Trilemma.
ANSWER: financial integration AND monetary independence [accept free capital flow or free capital movement in place of “financial integration”; accept independent monetary policy, sovereign monetary policy, or anything indicating having control over its own monetary policy in place of “monetary independence”]
[10] In order to deter short term speculation on currency transactions, this economist proposed a namesake tax that would be levied on currency transactions, thus reducing the volatility of exchange rates.
ANSWER: James Tobin
To my knowledge, the hard part was not converted at the Maryland site. Conversion data is still not out for the OSU site, and I'm not sure if any other sites will have detailed stats. I agree that the hard part was very difficult to give, but I did attempt to make the answerline as reasonably detailed and generous as possible. Regarding the Tobin tax clue, I think that made for a reasonable middle part since it fit this bonus's theme of exchange rates and was something that many (but not most) people would know about. I agree with you and Will Alston saying that there are other taxes that can and should come up, but I don't think that many of them would have made for an appropriate middle part in this particular context.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Jem Casey » Wed Dec 07, 2016 11:39 am

Progcon wrote:Can I see the tossup on English workers or whatever the exact answerline was? A teammate negged with "Proletariat" and didn't know what to say after being prompted. I was thinking just like "factory worker in England" right before he buzzed.
Terrapin, Packet 9 wrote:A book partly titled for this group claims that Methodism served as a “chiliasm of despair” in a chapter discussing prophets such as Joanna Southcott. The preface of that book titled for this group states that the author intends to rescue “the hand-loom weaver [and] the ‘utopian’ artisan… from the enormous condescension of posterity.” A book partly titled for this group describes the unplanned rows of houses in the filthy “courts” of the Old Town slum on the River Kirk. E. P. (*) Thompson examined the formative years of this group from 1780 to 1830 in a history of its “making.” Statistics about the mortality of this group from disease in cities such as Manchester are cited in Friedrich Engels’s book on the “Condition” of this group in England. For 10 points, identify this class of wage-laborers that is synonymous with the proletariat in Marxism.
ANSWER: the English working class [or the working class in England; prompt on related terms such as proletariat, blue-collar, or manual laborers]
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Periplus of the Erythraean Sea » Wed Dec 07, 2016 12:05 pm

So, I understand that almost all the books referenced in that tossup refer to the "working class" in their titles, but "proletariat" in common usage is often basically a synonym for the working class. Is there a reason not to just accept this, especially given that some of these books are by Marxists?
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Progcon » Wed Dec 07, 2016 2:38 pm

To my knowledge, the hard part was not converted at the Maryland site. Conversion data is still not out for the OSU site, and I'm not sure if any other sites will have detailed stats. I agree that the hard part was very difficult to give, but I did attempt to make the answerline as reasonably detailed and generous as possible. Regarding the Tobin tax clue, I think that made for a reasonable middle part since it fit this bonus's theme of exchange rates and was something that many (but not most) people would know about. I agree with you and Will Alston saying that there are other taxes that can and should come up, but I don't think that many of them would have made for an appropriate middle part in this particular context.
I was pleasantly surprised to see the trilemma come up because I knew it and 30d the bonus. I think the Tobin tax is interesting but tax policy is something I have been doing research on for over 12 months so I have a personal bias for asking about new topics. If I'm being objective, "Tobin Tax" is a fine medium part on regular difficulty. On the whole, I thought the economics in the set was very good and should serve as an example of how to write economics in the future. Thanks for writing.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by touchpack » Wed Dec 07, 2016 3:18 pm

Chicago A converted the Trilemma bonus part without too much difficulty.
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by CPiGuy » Wed Dec 07, 2016 3:33 pm

Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:So, I understand that almost all the books referenced in that tossup refer to the "working class" in their titles, but "proletariat" in common usage is often basically a synonym for the working class. Is there a reason not to just accept this, especially given that some of these books are by Marxists?
I think the point of the question is England, so had he said "the English proletariat" he'd be fine
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Periplus of the Erythraean Sea » Wed Dec 07, 2016 3:35 pm

CPiGuy wrote:
Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:So, I understand that almost all the books referenced in that tossup refer to the "working class" in their titles, but "proletariat" in common usage is often basically a synonym for the working class. Is there a reason not to just accept this, especially given that some of these books are by Marxists?
I think the point of the question is England, so had he said "the English proletariat" he'd be fine
It's not, because I buzzed on this question with "working class" and was awarded points.
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Jem Casey
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Jem Casey » Wed Dec 07, 2016 3:57 pm

Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:So, I understand that almost all the books referenced in that tossup refer to the "working class" in their titles, but "proletariat" in common usage is often basically a synonym for the working class. Is there a reason not to just accept this, especially given that some of these books are by Marxists?
This seems fair, especially since the term "proletariat" is used pretty ubiquitously in Engels's book. I'll adjust the answerline accordingly.
Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:
CPiGuy wrote:
Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:So, I understand that almost all the books referenced in that tossup refer to the "working class" in their titles, but "proletariat" in common usage is often basically a synonym for the working class. Is there a reason not to just accept this, especially given that some of these books are by Marxists?
I think the point of the question is England, so had he said "the English proletariat" he'd be fine
It's not, because I buzzed on this question with "working class" and was awarded points.
Yeah, for what it's worth, only _working class_ was required.
Jordan Brownstein, University of Maryland '17, Plymouth Regional '13, New Hampshire

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1.82
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by 1.82 » Fri Dec 16, 2016 6:12 am

Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:
CPiGuy wrote:
Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:So, I understand that almost all the books referenced in that tossup refer to the "working class" in their titles, but "proletariat" in common usage is often basically a synonym for the working class. Is there a reason not to just accept this, especially given that some of these books are by Marxists?
I think the point of the question is England, so had he said "the English proletariat" he'd be fine
It's not, because I buzzed on this question with "working class" and was awarded points.
How did you receive points for a tournament you didn't play?
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Periplus of the Erythraean Sea
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Re: 2016 Terrapin Specific Question Discussion and Errata

Post by Periplus of the Erythraean Sea » Fri Dec 16, 2016 11:07 am

Our Lady Peace wrote:
Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:
CPiGuy wrote:
Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:So, I understand that almost all the books referenced in that tossup refer to the "working class" in their titles, but "proletariat" in common usage is often basically a synonym for the working class. Is there a reason not to just accept this, especially given that some of these books are by Marxists?
I think the point of the question is England, so had he said "the English proletariat" he'd be fine
It's not, because I buzzed on this question with "working class" and was awarded points.
How did you receive points for a tournament you didn't play?
Practice!
Will Alston
Bethesda Chevy Chase HS '12, Dartmouth '16, Columbia Business School '21
NAQT Writer and Subject Editor

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