Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

This forum is for tournament announcements, updates, and results (official or otherwise).
User avatar
meebles127
Wakka
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:27 am
Location: Salem, Virginia
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by meebles127 »

Just a thing to note. An @Mod Powers role has been made in addition to the room roles. This allows mods to see the mod channel and rooms. Like the other roles, you can only hold one role at any given time.

Finally, if a player uses the "mod" role during a round when they are not a mod, they will be immediately banned, except upon appeal (for reasonable exceptions i.e. they left to get lunch or something).
Emily Gunter

Salem High School (Salem, Virginia) 2017-Present
Stats Gremlin 2020-Present

Author of: My Guide to High School Outreach and So You Want to Buy a Buzzer System

"It's by Dali, it has the creepy clocks, but I can't remember its name!"
User avatar
Iain.Carpenter
Lulu
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Jul 28, 2017 10:44 pm

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Iain.Carpenter »

naan/steak-holding toll wrote: Fri Apr 03, 2020 9:40 pm This being said, there will be two available procedures to kick people from rooms during a game:
  • Mods are allowed to kick people from rooms at any time - they should inform Emily and myself if they do so and explain why they kicked a player from their room.
  • If a player is being obnoxious, suspected of cheating, etc. then any three players in a room may initiate a vote to kick them. The player will be kicked if a two-thirds majority of players, rounded down, votes to remove them; mods will not vote in these procedures. The mod should then report this to Emily and myself.
Any player who is kicked twice, for whatever reason, will be banned from the rest of the tournament unless an adequate explanation is offered to myself and Emily. We will publicly name all such banned people and recommend that other organizers of online tournaments ban these people as well if they do not make public penance, and will recommend a permanent ban if they are caught cheating.
Thank you, this is exactly the sort of response I was hoping for (and which I hope becomes the standard for online tournaments); I hope that this clear, outlined response to suspected cheating and a definite list of consequences will preclude cheaters and help this tournament run smoothly!
Iain Carpenter
Mahomet-Seymour High School (2013-2017)
UIUC (2017-2021)
User avatar
Deepika Goes From Ranbir To Ranveer
Rikku
Posts: 301
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2012 2:42 pm

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Deepika Goes From Ranbir To Ranveer »

This is already a ton of fun, thank you to everyone who organised, wrote, moderates, donates, etc!
Aayush Rajasekaran (he/him or she/her)
University of Waterloo, 2016
University of Waterloo, 2018
csheep
Wakka
Posts: 134
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:16 pm

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by csheep »

This has been a very fun and exceptionally well-organized day of QB so far. Big thanks to Will and Em and everyone else involved for putting this together; to all the writers who had some great and fun packets; and to all the readers.

The smoothness of the logistics and the innovation of multi-room/tier readings immensely improved the experience IMO.
Michael Z
NYU '13
User avatar
meebles127
Wakka
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:27 am
Location: Salem, Virginia
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by meebles127 »

Thank you so much to everyone for coming out today to participate in the first half of the Internet Charity Tournament. We ran on time pretty much all day, had very few technical snafus, and it was a great experience for all involved. We'll be back tomorrow at 10 AM for more fun to round out the weekend.
Emily Gunter

Salem High School (Salem, Virginia) 2017-Present
Stats Gremlin 2020-Present

Author of: My Guide to High School Outreach and So You Want to Buy a Buzzer System

"It's by Dali, it has the creepy clocks, but I can't remember its name!"
User avatar
meebles127
Wakka
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:27 am
Location: Salem, Virginia
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by meebles127 »

A few people have asked for scoresheets from today. Linked below is the folder with the scoresheets from Day 1 of ICT. Some of the tabs aren't labeled with the names of the packets but they are all labeled with the time that they were read. If you need to reference the time please see the schedule. Also, I'm 99% sure that I turned off the ability to edit but if I missed it in one of them please don't be a dick and mess with the stats.

Stats
Emily Gunter

Salem High School (Salem, Virginia) 2017-Present
Stats Gremlin 2020-Present

Author of: My Guide to High School Outreach and So You Want to Buy a Buzzer System

"It's by Dali, it has the creepy clocks, but I can't remember its name!"
User avatar
Mike Bentley
Sin
Posts: 6141
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 11:03 pm
Location: Bellevue, WA
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Mike Bentley »

A suggestion for future versions of this event: I think it would be helpful if packet authors were clearer about the contents of their packet ahead of time. Providing a distribution can be really useful when trying to figure out your tier. i.e. Jason's packet was originally listed as "musical theater + phil/ss/middle east" on the schedule. A packet with 15 musical theater questions and 2 Middle Eastern questions is going to play differently than one with 8 musical theater questions and 8 Middle Eastern questions. I realize a lot of these packets are written at the last minute, but it seemed like a lot of people were sorting themselves wrongly which led to either stacked fields in lower tiers or me playing packets that I would have otherwise skipped if I had known how few of a certain sub-distro questions there were.

It'd also be great if there was an easier way to see who was in what tier a few minutes before the games started. "Oh, so and so thinks they're in this tier? I better be in a different one" was a pretty common occurrence but I didn't see much switching after people had selected a role.

I'd also personally like a future version of this event to have a more heavy-hand in choosing packets. Rather than having 3 lit packets that all focus on a similar subdistro it would be great if there was more variety. Or even a push to get people to write in some categories that felt underrepresented. I realize this is a guerrilla tournament and to some extent an outlet for questions people already have sitting around. But I'm guessing that at least some people are writing a non-trivial amount of new questions and could be at least nudged to include more of subdistribution X rather than Y if asked. Finally, I generally preferred the more loosely themed, cross-category packets (such as Matt Jackson's) and didn't feel like there really needed be a push for some packets to be extremely difficult. I'd prefer a future event with more (but not all) general-interest packets and more on the easier side of the difficulty spectrum.

All that being said, for my least favorite quizbowl format of playing vanity packets against really good competition, this event was well run and several of the rounds were enjoyable.
Mike Bentley
VP of Editing, Partnership for Academic Competition Excellence
Adviser, Quizbowl Team at University of Washington
University of Maryland, Class of 2008
User avatar
Cheynem
Sin
Posts: 6835
Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 11:19 am
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Cheynem »

I would like to thank Will and Emily for their hard work in organizing what seemed like a very good event. I only played two packets, but they were both well-run and things seemed to go smoothly and everyone enjoyed themselves.

I would say I generally agree with what Mike said above. I might suggest:

1. There be a deadline for packets like a week or a half-week before the actual event. That way, we know for a fact what all the content in the packets is and how many questions, etc.

2. That at least for the top tiers, a sign-up sheet so people can see who is playing and perhaps even more pertinently, how many people are playing. In the two games I played, I was trying to find enjoyable competition but also fairly reasonable room sizes (i.e. less than 10 people).

Obviously some of this requires even more work for the organizers, who already did a lot. For example, ideally, you'd do the survey to find interest, prepare the schedule, and then do another round of sign-ups to determine how to organize the rooms. That's a ton of work, and maybe if this happens again, more people can be part of the organizing process.

I'm happy that people enjoyed themselves on ICT weekend.
Mike Cheyne
Formerly U of Minnesota

"You killed HSAPQ"--Matt Bollinger
User avatar
Majin Buu Roi
Wakka
Posts: 141
Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 1:52 pm

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Majin Buu Roi »

Mike Bentley wrote: Sun Apr 05, 2020 5:12 pm A suggestion for future versions of this event: I think it would be helpful if packet authors were clearer about the contents of their packet ahead of time. Providing a distribution can be really useful when trying to figure out your tier. i.e. Jason's packet was originally listed as "musical theater + phil/ss/middle east" on the schedule.
I'm not arguing against anything in your post, but I do feel obliged to point out my packet description's vagueness is extremely my fault and equally extremely not the fault of anybody on the organizing side.
Jason Golfinos
Trinity School '13 (inexplicably in charge, 2011-13)
Princeton '17 (inexplicably in charge, 2015-16)
Cambridge '18
HLS '22
User avatar
Cheynem
Sin
Posts: 6835
Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 11:19 am
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Cheynem »

Man if I had known the packet was going to be mostly musical theater, I would have played! I was assuming it was going to be the reverse.
Mike Cheyne
Formerly U of Minnesota

"You killed HSAPQ"--Matt Bollinger
User avatar
Mike Bentley
Sin
Posts: 6141
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 11:03 pm
Location: Bellevue, WA
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Mike Bentley »

Majin Buu Roi wrote: Sun Apr 05, 2020 5:35 pm
Mike Bentley wrote: Sun Apr 05, 2020 5:12 pm A suggestion for future versions of this event: I think it would be helpful if packet authors were clearer about the contents of their packet ahead of time. Providing a distribution can be really useful when trying to figure out your tier. i.e. Jason's packet was originally listed as "musical theater + phil/ss/middle east" on the schedule.
I'm not arguing against anything in your post, but I do feel obliged to point out my packet description's vagueness is extremely my fault and equally extremely not the fault of anybody on the organizing side.
No worries, at least you gave a heads up in the chat beforehand.
Mike Bentley
VP of Editing, Partnership for Academic Competition Excellence
Adviser, Quizbowl Team at University of Washington
University of Maryland, Class of 2008
User avatar
Mike Bentley
Sin
Posts: 6141
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 11:03 pm
Location: Bellevue, WA
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Mike Bentley »

Also I should point out there were a ton of logistical things that this tournament did well that any future event like this should follow like splitting up into rooms, early sign ups, keeping on schedule, getting a good moderator field, etc.
Mike Bentley
VP of Editing, Partnership for Academic Competition Excellence
Adviser, Quizbowl Team at University of Washington
University of Maryland, Class of 2008
User avatar
naan/steak-holding toll
Auron
Posts: 2335
Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:53 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by naan/steak-holding toll »

Responding to a specific point noted above:
Mike Cheyne wrote:2. That at least for the top tiers, a sign-up sheet so people can see who is playing and perhaps even more pertinently, how many people are playing. In the two games I played, I was trying to find enjoyable competition but also fairly reasonable room sizes (i.e. less than 10 people).
This was considered, but we decided it was much too onerous to make people go and look at a sign-up sheet, especially when they'd likely be deciding what events to play based on convenience as well as interest. I answered at least a dozen questions that were explicitly outlined in either the Discord channel, the schedule, or the original post of this thread. None of this is particularly technically demanding on players, but it ends up with another extra step that can potentially disrupt the flow of everything. If the idea is for players to optionally indicate what room tier they'd like to play in, that's perhaps doable, but again I think you're likely to get very incomplete information there, at the cost of introducing another screen for people to look at if they'd like to get all the relevant information for what is ultimately supposed to be a fairly casual event.

That "casual" bit being said, I do think the overall lesson of this event is that setting deadlines and formalizing things really works! Specifically, you need to formalize things to the extent that they accomplish the goals of the event without introducing extra touchpoints (i.e. look at this extra signup sheet, etc.) unnecessarily, causing unneeded hassle to players and making things potentially go less smoothly. Perhaps events in the future can consider requiring early submissions or nudge people to have a bit wider of a range of packets brought to the table, but given the hackathon nature of this event, I think the way we implemented it worked out far better than I could have reasonably hoped.

Thanks again for participating, everyone! I'll be reaching out regarding donations tomorrow.
Will Alston
Bethesda Chevy Chase HS '12, Dartmouth '16, Columbia Business School '21
NAQT Writer and Subject Editor
User avatar
Cheynem
Sin
Posts: 6835
Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 11:19 am
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Cheynem »

Yeah, Will, I agree with your points--the organizing really worked (and the organizers were great), and that I wouldn't have expected the organizers/players necessarily to do sign-ups this year, just that it's something to consider for a future running. I had no problems playing and had a great time.
Mike Cheyne
Formerly U of Minnesota

"You killed HSAPQ"--Matt Bollinger
User avatar
ThisIsMyUsername
Yuna
Posts: 888
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2009 11:36 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by ThisIsMyUsername »

I thought that this tournament was a triumph! Thank you to Will, Emily, and the many writers/readers for what was a very enjoyable weekend of quizbowl and something of a logistical marvel (at least for the portions I was present for), given all of the moving pieces involved. Naturally, I hope that sometime in the near future, in-person tournaments are able to spring up again in their pre-pandemic volume, thus nixing the need for this as a nationals fill-in. But even so, I hope that this kind of tournament (with its spirit of charity) becomes something we repeat with some regularity.
John Lawrence
Yale University '12
King's College London '13
University of Chicago '20

“I am not absentminded. It is the presence of mind that makes me unaware of everything else.” - G.K. Chesterton
User avatar
naan/steak-holding toll
Auron
Posts: 2335
Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:53 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by naan/steak-holding toll »

I'd prefer a future event with more (but not all) general-interest packets and more on the easier side of the difficulty spectrum.
I disagree with this vision (not to deny your preference) for several reasons:
  • "General interest" is a really vague term here, but if mean more "mixed" events that appeal to more people, I frankly think having a zillion events where everyone shows up would be kind of boring. A lot of people got to show off cool niche specialties this weekend and a ton of people showed up just for a few packets that really appealed to their interests. That's awesome as far as I'm concerned. Another way to put it is that "general interest" events may have a lot of the same people showing up for a long time, but get a smaller overall audience because you're not drawing out as many of those folks who are really looking to rack up their Pokemon or Immunology points.
  • In fields that are ridiculously strong - i.e. you can put 10 ACF Nationals champions in a room - I do not think easier packets overall would play out better. Even in the middle and lower tier rooms there were a lot of buzzer races, which is to be anticipated, and even the brutally hard packets got a decent number of powers.
  • Part of the reason that an event like this works is because not everyone is expected to play everything, so you can staff or take breaks throughout the day. It solves the staffing issue by itself, lord knows how many hours Emily and I saved this week by not having to wrangle staffers. I guess some people would inevitably not be interested in some of the "general" events, but still, it's a numbers game as to who is both a) not interested in a given event and b) willing and available to staff.
EDITED for clarity.
Will Alston
Bethesda Chevy Chase HS '12, Dartmouth '16, Columbia Business School '21
NAQT Writer and Subject Editor
User avatar
Auroni
Auron
Posts: 3107
Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2007 6:23 pm
Location: Urbana

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Auroni »

ThisIsMyUsername wrote: Sun Apr 05, 2020 7:46 pm I thought that this tournament was a triumph! Thank you to Will, Emily, and the many writers/readers for what was a very enjoyable weekend of quizbowl and something of a logistical marvel (at least for the portions I was present for), given all of the moving pieces involved. Naturally, I hope that sometime in the near future, in-person tournaments are able to spring up again in their pre-pandemic volume, thus nixing the need for this as a nationals fill-in. But even so, I hope that this kind of tournament (with its spirit of charity) becomes something we repeat with some regularity.
Echoing this. Will and Em deserve a lot of praise for putting this together at a moment when people have many justifiable misgivings about online quizbowl, and having it be such an unqualified success.
Auroni Gupta (she/they)
UIUC
ACF
User avatar
Deepika Goes From Ranbir To Ranveer
Rikku
Posts: 301
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2012 2:42 pm

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Deepika Goes From Ranbir To Ranveer »

This tournament was a complete - and to be perfectly honest, unexpected - triumph. I'm genuinely in awe of the organisation. Huge thanks!
Aayush Rajasekaran (he/him or she/her)
University of Waterloo, 2016
University of Waterloo, 2018
A Dim-Witted Saboteur
Yuna
Posts: 947
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2016 12:31 pm
Location: Lansing

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by A Dim-Witted Saboteur »

This was cool. Thanks for putting it on, everyone who was involved in putting it on!
Jakob Myers
MSU '21, Naperville North (IL) '17
"No one has ever organized a greater effort to get people interested in pretending to play quiz bowl"
-Ankit Aggarwal
They/them, retired
User avatar
meebles127
Wakka
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:27 am
Location: Salem, Virginia
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by meebles127 »

A month of planning followed by 2 days, 6 rooms, 38 packets and writers, 49 moderators, 122 individual readings, 205 unique players, 898 individual toss-ups, and 3055 toss-ups heard later, the 2020 Internet Charity Tournament has concluded.

I would like to give a huge thank you to everyone who came out to play this weekend. It's been a true honor to have worked on this with Will over the last month and I'd like to send a huge thank you out to all of the writers, moderators, and players who made this happen. It's been a true joy to put this together (and a great distraction from the ongoing pandemic) and it makes me so happy that so many people were able to have so much fun this weekend. I'd additionally like to make it very clear that Will was completely removed from any aspects of the tournament involving unclear content while it was running. Will played many events throughout the tournament and we wanted to remove any possibility of impropriety that could arise. I received every packet by email and I was the one who handled distribution during the tournament.

I'd like to give special thanks to Will Alston for coming up with this idea and spending so much time working with me to figure out how to improve the shootout experience. Will crafted an amazing schedule which combined with my efforts during the weekend resulted in a tournament that never ran more than 10 minutes behind. I can not think of any other tournament of this size that has ever run that close to the posted schedule. Ever.

I'd also like to thank Matt Mitchell for leaving comments on every event in the schedule, making it less onerous for people to know what was happening in a given time block. I have received many messages stating that this was extremely helpful.

I'd also just like to thank everyone who has reached out to me stating that they enjoyed the tournament. I wasn't exactly sure where this was going to go and I became very pleasantly surprised as the weekend went on. This was an incredibly exhausting, yet enjoyable and rewarding experience and I pass along thanks to everyone that was a part of this. I was also amused that the turtle emoji became a bit of a meme over the course of the weekend. Over the next couple of days, and possibly weeks depending on what's going on, I'm going to clean the stats up, post them here, get the packets uploaded to the archives, and Will will be sending out donation information tomorrow. If you did not sign up for the tournament in the google form and indicate your intent to donate please contact him for donation information. I will additionally be making a post in the future about a project I am working on regarding the implementation of Discord bots to streamline and improve the Discord tournament experience for all involved.

Thanks again for an amazing weekend. Y'all are great.
Emily Gunter

Salem High School (Salem, Virginia) 2017-Present
Stats Gremlin 2020-Present

Author of: My Guide to High School Outreach and So You Want to Buy a Buzzer System

"It's by Dali, it has the creepy clocks, but I can't remember its name!"
User avatar
The Story of a Head That Fell Off
Lulu
Posts: 79
Joined: Wed May 25, 2016 3:43 am

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by The Story of a Head That Fell Off »

For such a busy schedule with so many different moving parts, this ran remarkably well! The only complaint I have is probably that people are generally really terrible at judging their own skill levels, but that might be just be the fact each room has a lot of people (like, close to 20 in most cases) so it seems like even players in the lower rooms were getting very good early buzzes on some packets.

Even the visual packets ran pretty well too despite some tech snafus, hopefully as we learn to adopt to our Discord overlords it will be better next time!
Mike Bentley wrote: Sun Apr 05, 2020 5:12 pm I'd also personally like a future version of this event to have a more heavy-hand in choosing packets. Rather than having 3 lit packets that all focus on a similar subdistro it would be great if there was more variety. Or even a push to get people to write in some categories that felt underrepresented. I realize this is a guerrilla tournament and to some extent an outlet for questions people already have sitting around. But I'm guessing that at least some people are writing a non-trivial amount of new questions and could be at least nudged to include more of subdistribution X rather than Y if asked.
I strongly disagree with this point - this event was only as fun because people of the large variety of questions on certain subjects. I believe the intent was to allow people to write what they want. I felt, at least in the packets that I played, a lot of nice underrepresented topics were tackled. Of course, it would be great that if there's a wider spread of topics tackled, as a lot of parts of the core canon weren't really covered, while as you mention, there were many literature packets. At the same time, this event definitely is more of a labor of love - I don't know if people would want to write more of topic Y instead of X if they were asked if they were not originally intending to do so - in an ideal world great questions can just come and go, but (at least for me) it's extremely hard to write questions on topics I am not already passionate about. No one wants their passion project to be rejected because "we have too many of it already".

And another point is that trying to get a distro going would sort of ruin the more "out there" ideas. I did not play the bird or knitting packets, but I'm very excited to read them afterwards to learn more about subjects I know next to nothing about! It was refreshing to have a non-Festivus event where we get to see wacky vanity packets like this.
Jeremy "JJ" Tsai
Rutgers 2016-2019 (President 2018-2019)
"Maryland" 2019-2021
Woody
Lulu
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Apr 27, 2010 7:10 pm

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Woody »

This event was great and I had a lot of fun on the small subset of the packets that I played!
I do think the difficulty was a little too high for my personal preferences, but I probably wasn't really the target audience. I loved how diverse the subject matters covered were, and how each packet was its own fun niche.
Jimmy Dunn
DeWitt High School Quiz Bowl 2004-2009
Michigan State University 2009-2013
DeWitt High School Quiz Bowl Coach 2017-present
User avatar
t-bar
Tidus
Posts: 649
Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2009 4:12 pm
Location: Cambridge, MA

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by t-bar »

The technical innovations that made this tournament possible were fantastic, and Emily deserves huge accolades for them. I was also very impressed by the amount of goodwill and energy to make quizbowl happen that I saw from this event's writers and moderators, as well as the gratitude displayed by the players. In my opinion, the Internet Charity Tournament was an unqualified success.

I would love for events like this to happen in the future. However, I wonder if it would be better to restrict the scope a bit so the whole event can fit in one day. This weekend was pretty exhausting and time-consuming if you participated in a lot of events.

I also agree with Mike Bentley that we could rethink what sort of packets would be best for this type of event, though I would frame it as "setting a clear standard for what a packet should look like" rather than "restricting which packets we allow in." In particular, I propose the following guidelines:
  1. Packets should conform to IRL-quizbowl standards for proofreading, answerline completeness, and document formatting, even if they're off-the-wall in terms of difficulty and topic selection. Reading Discord events is pretty taxing under ideal conditions, especially if you're scorekeeping for 20 players at once. Anything writers can do to make the communication flow of quizbowl easier is appreciated. Guerrilla tournaments sometimes assign a redactor who doesn't fully edit the questions, but does identify and remove repeats. Maybe a similar formatting czar could consult with packet-writers on how to make their packets easy to use in-game.
  2. Each packet should have a simple, coherent theme. This ensures that people know what they're signing up for. The theme can be broad—I thought the "Americana" and "East Asia" packets both had a very good sense of their scope and purpose. But while "Writer-gories" packets can be entertaining and highly personal, it's difficult to anticipate what they'll be like if you aren't a friend of the writer. (Sorry to single out Wonyoung specifically, but I'm skeptical that the term "mixed impure academic," as defined by NAQT, would communicate the flavor of his packet to someone who had never met him.)
    • I personally prefer that each packet have a single theme, but I feel less strongly about this. If you have the itch to write a "soccer + opera" packet, I would rather your questions be heard than not, but IMO it would be better for you to instead find one collaborator for a "soccer" packet and a different collaborator for an "opera" packet (see final paragraph for more).
  3. Packets should not include traditional bonuses. In the context of an individual free-for-all, they slow down the game and don't enhance the playing experience much. There's definitely room for creative question structures, though—I thought Briana's bird identification speed round was fun, for example.
  4. Tossup-only packets should include between 20 and 40 tossups, and packets with other types of content should be of an equivalent length. I suspect that longer packets produce diminishing marginal enjoyment among the field and eat up valuable time, though I didn't observe the longest packet (Collins) so I could be off-base here. Shorter packets can be unsatisfying, especially if you're expecting more. More concretely, you still have to block out at least 30 minutes of the schedule and occupy however many rooms are needed, which for 12-15 tossups seems as inefficient as having mammoth packets.
One potential drawback of these guidelines is that the people who will find them onerous are likely the most marginal or inexperienced writers—points 2 and 4 seem especially difficult if you're starting from a point of "I've never written in bulk before but I have four tossup ideas on things that I like." I definitely don't want to discourage these writers, so maybe we can address this by encouraging collaboration on packets. I'd like to again hold out the "East Asia" packet as exemplary, as its writer tags suggest that three different writers each worked in their areas of interest in synergistic ways. Perhaps the next time there's a cattle call for vanity questions, it can proceed in two stages: one in which people articulate desires to write some number and topic of questions, and one in which those desires are condensed into "complete" packets. This can occur in tandem with some of the accountability standards that Mike Cheyne proposed, so writers don't wind up in the "oops I only wrote 5 questions and didn't find a collaborator" scenario.
Stephen Eltinge
TJHSST 2011 | MIT 2015 | Yale 20??
ACF member | PACE member | NAQT writer
User avatar
Cheynem
Sin
Posts: 6835
Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 11:19 am
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Cheynem »

While this would again present more onerous labor, perhaps something like a group of 5-6 experienced people could volunteer to work as packet redactors (especially for more inexperienced writers)? Like, they would look at a packet they aren't planning on playing and not offer content or clue information, but simply note issues in formatting or "should you prompt?" type scenarios that a typical moderator reading might find frustrating (in other words, they wouldn't say "This clue is too early for Twain or Richard II," but they might say "you should accept Samuel Clemens or prompt on Richard").

I think the key thing is while the writers themselves would know when to prompt or when not to prompt or how to interpret an answerline, other moderators might not.
Mike Cheyne
Formerly U of Minnesota

"You killed HSAPQ"--Matt Bollinger
User avatar
meebles127
Wakka
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:27 am
Location: Salem, Virginia
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by meebles127 »

All of the packets, save for the East Asia packet Tyler asked that I withhold temporarily, have been submitted for upload to the archives.
Emily Gunter

Salem High School (Salem, Virginia) 2017-Present
Stats Gremlin 2020-Present

Author of: My Guide to High School Outreach and So You Want to Buy a Buzzer System

"It's by Dali, it has the creepy clocks, but I can't remember its name!"
User avatar
meebles127
Wakka
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:27 am
Location: Salem, Virginia
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by meebles127 »

The packets are now available on the archives.

2020 Internet Charity Tournament
Emily Gunter

Salem High School (Salem, Virginia) 2017-Present
Stats Gremlin 2020-Present

Author of: My Guide to High School Outreach and So You Want to Buy a Buzzer System

"It's by Dali, it has the creepy clocks, but I can't remember its name!"
csheep
Wakka
Posts: 134
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:16 pm

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by csheep »

t-bar wrote: Mon Apr 06, 2020 5:31 pm (Sorry to single out Wonyoung specifically, but I'm skeptical that the term "mixed impure academic," as defined by NAQT, would communicate the flavor of his packet to someone who had never met him.)

[...]

I'd like to again hold out the "East Asia" packet as exemplary, as its writer tags suggest that three different writers each worked in their areas of interest in synergistic ways.
I agree strongly with pretty much everything in Stephen's post, but in particular the quoted two points.

A particular shame, as reading through the Wonyoung packet, I would've enjoyed it immensely, I had no idea what"mixed Impure academic" was, nor does this packet evoke feelings of the term as I'm reading through it now (but it's a delight!).

I also want to voice agreement for JJ's comments regarding subjects/categories and specific/niche packets - those are fun and I highly enjoyed the more "out there" stuff, moreso than a broader/general distribution.
Michael Z
NYU '13
User avatar
Deepika Goes From Ranbir To Ranveer
Rikku
Posts: 301
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2012 2:42 pm

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by Deepika Goes From Ranbir To Ranveer »

I'll add that describing a pack as "Things I like" or "Name-gories" isn't great, because many people don't know what you like.
Aayush Rajasekaran (he/him or she/her)
University of Waterloo, 2016
University of Waterloo, 2018
User avatar
naan/steak-holding toll
Auron
Posts: 2335
Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:53 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by naan/steak-holding toll »

I am pleased to report that, as of right now, ICT has raised the following for charity:
  • $3,000.91 in donations which I have received (which I shall be sending to the CDC Foundation shortly)
  • $1,465.00 in donations which have been made by others independently to the CDC Foundation or local charities
If you have played the packets but not donated and still wish to donate, I strongly encourage you to make a donation on your own to a charity doing work for COVID-19, or another charity of your choice.

Thank you all for participating and making this event an enormous success. I hope you all remain safe and well.
Will Alston
Bethesda Chevy Chase HS '12, Dartmouth '16, Columbia Business School '21
NAQT Writer and Subject Editor
User avatar
meebles127
Wakka
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:27 am
Location: Salem, Virginia
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by meebles127 »

All readings of Vaughan's et. al's "Untitled East Asia" packet have been completed and the packet will be uploaded to the "2020 Internet Charity Tournament" entry on the archives shortly.

And again, thanks to all who donated and had fun at this event. Stay safe, y'all.

edited for clarity.
Emily Gunter

Salem High School (Salem, Virginia) 2017-Present
Stats Gremlin 2020-Present

Author of: My Guide to High School Outreach and So You Want to Buy a Buzzer System

"It's by Dali, it has the creepy clocks, but I can't remember its name!"
User avatar
meebles127
Wakka
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:27 am
Location: Salem, Virginia
Contact:

Re: Internet Charity Tournament (April 4th, 5th)

Post by meebles127 »

Vaughan et. al's "Untitled East Asia" packet is now on the archives under the "2020 Internet Charity Tournament" entry.
Emily Gunter

Salem High School (Salem, Virginia) 2017-Present
Stats Gremlin 2020-Present

Author of: My Guide to High School Outreach and So You Want to Buy a Buzzer System

"It's by Dali, it has the creepy clocks, but I can't remember its name!"
Post Reply