2017 Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Elaborate on the merits of specific tournaments or have general theoretical discussion here.
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2017 Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by ValenciaQBowl » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:50 pm

I look forward to comments on the DB 2017 set. Billy Beyer wrote all the science, I wrote most of the lit and myth and philosophy and religion and social science and some of the history and everything else. Peter Torres and Sean Platzer wrote a lot of the history and helped with lit and geography and trash and other stuff.

I'll throw in the standard disclaimer about the difficulty of trying to write bonuses that had middle parts easy enough for most of the field in Orlando while not being overly easy for mirrors. As always, we likely mostly failed. But I hope the toss-ups were pyramidal and interesting. In any case, fire away.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by CPiGuy » Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:02 pm

I enjoyed playing this set. I'll also add that so did all of the new players we brought to the tournament. I thought there were a number of tossups which seemed pretty transparent, like I could buzz correctly without actually recognizing any of the clues, but maybe that's unavoidable and part of my knowing some things about stuff. In any event, here's a big list of feedback about specific questions. I'll avoid saying "this was too easy", especially about tossups, unless it was egregiously so, since I think that's probably the intent of the tournament.

The podcasts bonus from packet 1 was waaaaaaaaay too hard for this set. I'm pretty sure it's going to be either a 0 or a 10 for basically every team at the tournament. I'd expect a bonus like this to come up at D1 ICT, to be honest.

The tossup on "prayer" was kinda transparent -- what's a thing that the New Testament gives guidance on performing?

Really enjoyed the bonus on Tim O'Brien.

The TU on American flags in art seemed pretty hard -- all the stuff until Jasper Johns seemed too hard for this tournament, but I also don't know much about art, so take that with a grain of salt.

The tossup on "cis" had a false clue -- the letter E actually stands for trans things, not cis things. Thankfully, I didn't neg here because I don't know much chemistry so I wasn't sure, but I did hold off of buzzing, and getting beat to this question changed the outcome of a game.

The tossup on the Royal Air Force was a cool idea.

The tossup on Don Quixote seemed pretty transparent; it was "work of literature with weird chivalric stuff".

I liked the tossup on the Roman Senate.

The tossup on popes in art was questionable; I got it off of "zucchetto", which seemed easier than many of the art clues around it, so it seemed as though you made this question easier (which is good) but then made it less off of art knowledge and more off of "what do popes do".

I'm not a big fan of tossups on countries in science, since it generally just turns into "what country does this person's name sound like", and there are several countries that someone named Erlenmeyer could feasibly be from. The country of origin of various scientists doesn't really fall into the kind of knowledge that I think should get asked about in the science distribution.

Steppenwolf is probably too hard, but maybe not.

The Mozart operas bonus seemed hard; Abduction from [some place that's illegible in my notes] and Singspiel are both hard parts at this difficulty, I think -- at least, our music player thought so.

Tossups on specific years are pretty stupid in my opinion.

I'm not sure the clue about mangrove forests was unique to Everglades NP -- aren't there those things in the other southern Florida national parks?

Packet 5 had two bonuses (the one on Virgil and the one on Mormonism) that used the Garden of Eden as a hard part. I understand these are different subjects, but that's probably not advisable. (Incidentally, it was cool to see the Pearl of Great Price come up -- it was a good variation from the typical easy-Mormon-bonus formula.)

The tossup on Kristen Bell seemed difficult, but maybe our room was just clueless?

The Twin Peaks bonus was also outrageously hard, awarding a maximum of ten points unless you've watched the show. Actually, this illustrates what I think is the biggest problem with the set -- the film/TV trash was significantly harder than basically everything else.

The Burr/Hamilton question was super easy -- you should be aware that the first clue is a major plot point in Hamilton, which is a very popular musical, so anyone who's listened to it is probably getting that tossup on the first clue.

I got the tossup on Ulysses on the first clue solely from "huh, these are places in Dublin". If that was your intent, great, but if not, you might want to drop fewer than 5 geographical locations.

What was tossup 8 in round 6? I seem to have neglected to record it, but I know it went dead, and I seem to remember it being a super hard trash thing.

The tossup on the number 5 from computational stuff was bad. Computational questions just generally don't work in quizbowl, as I learned when I tried to include some in Math Monstrosity.

The first clue of the tossup on "translating the Bible" didn't really rule out "reading the Bible/Torah", which I buzzed with and was later granted with on protest. Perhaps you should change the first clue to make the distinction more clear. Otherwise, though, that was a super cool tossup.

The tossup on 13 in math seemed pretty hard.

I'm interested if the tossup on the 1950s was entirely from soccer / sports -- I got it on the first clue. Really enjoyed seeing the Magical Magyars come up.

The tossup on cranial nerves seemed easy to fraud.

The bonus that started with the Bridge of San Luiz Fey was too hard in my opinion, but maybe not?

The bonus on Dublin was very difficult for people who have not been to Dublin. I would have had 30, but I think the Liffey and Phoenix Park are both hard parts. Maybe replace one of them with, like, the Post Office or something and tie it into the Easter Rising?

Cnidaria is probably a hard answerline, but that was a really cool tossup.

The RSA/Shor's algorithm/Turing question was super cool, especially the hard part.

The video games bonus that started with Middle Earth: Shadow of War was, as with much of the trash, far too hard.

Quetzalcoatlus is a stupid hard part that nobody will have heard of and therefore just encourages "choose a random Latin suffix and slap it on Quetzalcoatl". We chose poorly. Incidentally, the bonus part on the K-T extinction should probably accept "the extinction at the end of the Cretaceous", since that's certainly uniquely identifying.

alright, that's all I have for now. Thanks for a great tournament!
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by ValenciaQBowl » Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:50 pm

Thanks for all the specific comments, Conor! I enjoy hearing all those details. I'll address some now.
The podcasts bonus from packet 1 was waaaaaaaaay too hard for this set. I'm pretty sure it's going to be either a 0 or a 10 for basically every team at the tournament. I'd expect a bonus like this to come up at D1 ICT, to be honest.
Fair enough. I think the writer thought some of these might be things that you kids today listen to, but I imagine that's wrong.
The tossup on "prayer" was kinda transparent -- what's a thing that the New Testament gives guidance on performing?
I can understand this criticism, though I would think there are all kinds of actions the NT gives advice on: how to treat children, how to interact with Romans, how to treat the poor, etc. The opening clue is uniquely identifying, and if you know that quote, great; if you've got the guts to go on your hunch, that's okay with me, too.
The TU on American flags in art seemed pretty hard -- all the stuff until Jasper Johns seemed too hard for this tournament, but I also don't know much about art, so take that with a grain of salt.
I agree with you here. Every year I write some stuff that opens a lot harder than your typical novice tournament. Some of that is pure vanity: my wanting to learn things and enjoy the process, but I don't mind a couple TUs that will go on for a while. And now you know that there's a guy who made a flag out of his own skin!
The tossup on "cis" had a false clue -- the letter E actually stands for trans things, not cis things. Thankfully, I didn't neg here because I don't know much chemistry so I wasn't sure, but I did hold off of buzzing, and getting beat to this question changed the outcome of a game.
I will be sure Billy hears this. I'm sorry it changed a game outcome.
The tossup on Don Quixote seemed pretty transparent; it was "work of literature with weird chivalric stuff".
Well, here we get to the trouble with "transparency" at a tournament of this level. If you're a good player with lots of HS experience, you can probably make such a determination on the fly. Here's the opener to that Quixote TU: "This character attacks a puppet whom he thinks has been cruel in a show, and ends up injuring the puppeteer, who is Gines de Pasamonte in disguise. This character believes his library was destroyed by the wizard Freston...." You are probably capable of thinking, "Hmm, attacks a puppet? A Spanish-sounding name? A wizard??? I know they can't be asking about "Orlando Furioso" at a tournament of this level, so...." But I think that's a legit event from that literary work, and I reckon there aren't many clues one could use from Quixote that wouldn't place it in its time period. So such things are just going to happen. I guess all I'd say is kudos if you're able to sniff out such a question even when you're not sure of the clues.
The tossup on popes in art was questionable; I got it off of "zucchetto", which seemed easier than many of the art clues around it, so it seemed as though you made this question easier (which is good) but then made it less off of art knowledge and more off of "what do popes do".
Yup, I included the zucchetto clue to allow some folks to slip in with their cool pope knowledge. But I reckon I could put that clue into the third clue space, after the Velazquez pope description.

I don't think Steppenwolf is too hard for this level, but it's close. And know for the future the Mozart opera is "Abduction from the Seraglio," a seraglio being an Italian name for a Turkish harem.
Tossups on specific years are pretty stupid in my opinion.
We'll have to disagree on this. I think years like 1848 are pretty important to know.
I'm not sure the clue about mangrove forests was unique to Everglades NP -- aren't there those things in the other southern Florida national parks?
The Everglades is the only NP in Florida! And here's that toss-up opener: "A tree in this national park is called “Chekika Island” after a Spanish-speaking tribal leader murdered there in revenge for an attack on US soldiers. That tree is in this park’s Shark Valley, where a huge observation tower allows 20-mile panoramic views around this low-lying national park. Protected mangroves populate this park’s Ten Thousand Islands area." So by the time you get to the mangroves some very uniquely identifying clues have been presented.
The Burr/Hamilton question was super easy -- you should be aware that the first clue is a major plot point in Hamilton, which is a very popular musical, so anyone who's listened to it is probably getting that tossup on the first clue.

I got the tossup on Ulysses on the first clue solely from "huh, these are places in Dublin". If that was your intent, great, but if not, you might want to drop fewer than 5 geographical locations.
Billy told me that the Schuyler clue was important in Hamilton, and my thinking was, "Who the hell has been able to see Hamilton???" But I guess you musical lovers have the album and such. So my bad. I think I'll fix that by not asking about Alexander Hamilton for the next seven years!

As to Ulysses, really??? Here's the opener: "One protagonist of this novel wonders if he’s “walking into eternity down Sandymount Strand” after leaving the Martello Tower he shares. Later on that same beach, Gerty McDowell lifts her skirt while watching a fireworks show, knowingly allowing the other protagonist of this novel to pleasure himself while watching. The first protagonist of this novel gets beat up by two British soldiers after causing a ruckus in Bella Cohen’s brothel in this novel’s 15th chapter." The only geographical clue I see there is Sandymount Strand, and I reckon a fellow named Conor might be able to simply know that's a beach outside Dublin, and that thus this must be describing Ulysses, but I imagine that's somewhat uncommon. But good for you!
The Twin Peaks bonus was also outrageously hard, awarding a maximum of ten points unless you've watched the show
I figure ten points is all you should be able to get if you haven't watched the show. But honestly, I'm going to disagree with that assessment. I'm pasting the bonus below, and I would suggest that one could easily answer the first and last parts even if one had never seen either iteration of the show:

A fairly long segment of this 2017 reboot takes place inside an atomic bomb explosion. For 10 points each:
[10] The murder of Laura Palmer was the original mystery on what show, which originally began in 1990?
ANSWER: Twin Peaks
[10] The Red Room in which Twin Peaks protagonist Dale Cooper originally saw the Giant and the backwards-talking dwarf is part of this possibly extradimensional location.
ANSWER: The Black Lodge
[10] This co-creator, with Mark Frost, of Twin Peaks is this idiosyncratic director of movies like Lost Highway, Blue Velvet, and Eraserhead.
ANSWER: David Lynch

You don't need to have seen the show at all for the third part, and the first part references the most important part of the show's summary.
The first clue of the tossup on "translating the Bible" didn't really rule out "reading the Bible/Torah", which I buzzed with and was later granted with on protest. Perhaps you should change the first clue to make the distinction more clear. Otherwise, though, that was a super cool tossup.
[/quote]

Good to know that about the Masoretic Texts. I'm not sure how to make it clearer, but I reckon I can look into it.

Anyway, I hope this didn't sound defensive: I really enjoyed hearing your thoughts on the questions. I hope others will follow suit. And don't hesitate to argue anything I said here or bring up other points.

Oh, wait--the #8 in Round 6 is a toss-up on "Okja," a movie on Netflix that has gotten a great deal of buzz in film circles, and which plenty of players at our site were excited about. You should see it, and you should also see "Snowpiercer," the director's last movie. Cheers!

Edit: stupid quote formatting.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by CPiGuy » Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:19 pm

ValenciaQBowl wrote:Thanks for all the specific comments, Conor! I enjoy hearing all those details. I'll address some now.
The podcasts bonus from packet 1 was waaaaaaaaay too hard for this set. I'm pretty sure it's going to be either a 0 or a 10 for basically every team at the tournament. I'd expect a bonus like this to come up at D1 ICT, to be honest.
Fair enough. I think the writer thought some of these might be things that you kids today listen to, but I imagine that's wrong.
Yeah, the way I would change it is probably just to have an easy part of "podcasts", and then take out either the medium or hard part.
ValenciaQBowl wrote:
The TU on American flags in art seemed pretty hard -- all the stuff until Jasper Johns seemed too hard for this tournament, but I also don't know much about art, so take that with a grain of salt.
I agree with you here. Every year I write some stuff that opens a lot harder than your typical novice tournament. Some of that is pure vanity: my wanting to learn things and enjoy the process, but I don't mind a couple TUs that will go on for a while. And now you know that there's a guy who made a flag out of his own skin!
Fair enough. And yeah, that's a pretty cool clue, even if it did induce me to neg with "lamps" -- alas, it was not the skin lamp
ValenciaQBowl wrote:
The tossup on Don Quixote seemed pretty transparent; it was "work of literature with weird chivalric stuff".
Well, here we get to the trouble with "transparency" at a tournament of this level. If you're a good player with lots of HS experience, you can probably make such a determination on the fly. Here's the opener to that Quixote TU: "This character attacks a puppet whom he thinks has been cruel in a show, and ends up injuring the puppeteer, who is Gines de Pasamonte in disguise. This character believes his library was destroyed by the wizard Freston...." You are probably capable of thinking, "Hmm, attacks a puppet? A Spanish-sounding name? A wizard??? I know they can't be asking about "Orlando Furioso" at a tournament of this level, so...." But I think that's a legit event from that literary work, and I reckon there aren't many clues one could use from Quixote that wouldn't place it in its time period. So such things are just going to happen. I guess all I'd say is kudos if you're able to sniff out such a question even when you're not sure of the clues.
It's less about "placing it in its time period" and more about Don Quixote being notably suuuuuper eccentric, so maybe don't mention lots of really eccentric things this obviously Spanish literary character does in the first couple clues.
ValenciaQBowl wrote:I don't think Steppenwolf is too hard for this level, but it's close. And know for the future the Mozart opera is "Abduction from the Seraglio," a seraglio being an Italian name for a Turkish harem.
Yeah, if it were me I'd just change the tossup to be on Hesse but not change any of the clues except the giveaway; that would increase conversion while not really compromising difficulty.
ValenciaQBowl wrote:
I'm not sure the clue about mangrove forests was unique to Everglades NP -- aren't there those things in the other southern Florida national parks?
The Everglades is the only NP in Florida! And here's that toss-up opener: "A tree in this national park is called “Chekika Island” after a Spanish-speaking tribal leader murdered there in revenge for an attack on US soldiers. That tree is in this park’s Shark Valley, where a huge observation tower allows 20-mile panoramic views around this low-lying national park. Protected mangroves populate this park’s Ten Thousand Islands area." So by the time you get to the mangroves some very uniquely identifying clues have been presented.
The Everglades is definitely not the only national park in Florida. I thought the mangrove clue was earlier, so you're right that it probably shouldn't affect gameplay, though.
ValenciaQBowl wrote:
The Burr/Hamilton question was super easy -- you should be aware that the first clue is a major plot point in Hamilton, which is a very popular musical, so anyone who's listened to it is probably getting that tossup on the first clue.

I got the tossup on Ulysses on the first clue solely from "huh, these are places in Dublin". If that was your intent, great, but if not, you might want to drop fewer than 5 geographical locations.
Billy told me that the Schuyler clue was important in Hamilton, and my thinking was, "Who the hell has been able to see Hamilton???" But I guess you musical lovers have the album and such. So my bad. I think I'll fix that by not asking about Alexander Hamilton for the next seven years!

As to Ulysses, really??? Here's the opener: "One protagonist of this novel wonders if he’s “walking into eternity down Sandymount Strand” after leaving the Martello Tower he shares. Later on that same beach, Gerty McDowell lifts her skirt while watching a fireworks show, knowingly allowing the other protagonist of this novel to pleasure himself while watching. The first protagonist of this novel gets beat up by two British soldiers after causing a ruckus in Bella Cohen’s brothel in this novel’s 15th chapter." The only geographical clue I see there is Sandymount Strand, and I reckon a fellow named Conor might be able to simply know that's a beach outside Dublin, and that thus this must be describing Ulysses, but I imagine that's somewhat uncommon. But good for you!
I don't think you need to not ask about Alexander Hamilton, but it does make sense to adjust for what people will and won't know, so if there's something later in the tossup that doesn't appear in the musical, maybe move it earlier?
also, I definitely remembered more geographical clues than Sandymount Strand and Martello towers (which, while not unique to Ireland, are a major feature of its coastline). That's alright, then, in my opinion.
ValenciaQBowl wrote:
The Twin Peaks bonus was also outrageously hard, awarding a maximum of ten points unless you've watched the show
I figure ten points is all you should be able to get if you haven't watched the show. But honestly, I'm going to disagree with that assessment. I'm pasting the bonus below, and I would suggest that one could easily answer the first and last parts even if one had never seen either iteration of the show:

A fairly long segment of this 2017 reboot takes place inside an atomic bomb explosion. For 10 points each:
[10] The murder of Laura Palmer was the original mystery on what show, which originally began in 1990?
ANSWER: Twin Peaks
[10] The Red Room in which Twin Peaks protagonist Dale Cooper originally saw the Giant and the backwards-talking dwarf is part of this possibly extradimensional location.
ANSWER: The Black Lodge
[10] This co-creator, with Mark Frost, of Twin Peaks is this idiosyncratic director of movies like Lost Highway, Blue Velvet, and Eraserhead.
ANSWER: David Lynch

You don't need to have seen the show at all for the third part, and the first part references the most important part of the show's summary.
Alright; you're correct, but I'm not sure "you don't get more than 10 unless you've seen this show" is a good approach to an easy tournament.
ValenciaQBowl wrote:Anyway, I hope this didn't sound defensive: I really enjoyed hearing your thoughts on the questions. I hope others will follow suit. And don't hesitate to argue anything I said here or bring up other points.
It certainly didn't!
ValenciaQBowl wrote:Oh, wait--the #8 in Round 6 is a toss-up on "Okja," a movie on Netflix that has gotten a great deal of buzz in film circles, and which plenty of players at our site were excited about. You should see it, and you should also see "Snowpiercer," the director's last movie. Cheers!
Yeah, that tossup got a big round of "what the hell" at our site, but if it's popular in "film circles" it's probably worth including. It did contribute to the fact that the trash was the hardest category though.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by ValenciaQBowl » Tue Nov 21, 2017 9:20 am

Daaaamn, Conor, I can't believe you called me out on my lack of knowledge of Florida's national parks! My home state! Cold, man. But seriously, I had no idea that Biscayne and Dry Tortugas were NPs--I figured they were monuments or reserves or something. But good to know. Fortunately this is a private forum, and later I'll delete all the posts and pretend it never happened.

And I can see the trash being a bit odd in this tournament. Some of this is Billy's predilection for people like Kristen Bell,and other trash that's not interesting to people your age. But how did you like Szechuan Sauce? (Too easy?). And what about the Trump handshakes and punching a Nazi questions? Those last two were mine, and I'm not sure I pulled them off; I had an answerline I thought was clever and interesting, but in practice both were probably flawed.

But anyway, seriously, check out Okja.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by wd4gdz » Tue Nov 21, 2017 10:14 am

I like having something to read in the 2017 Delta Burke discussion forum (in addition to the E/Z correction), but I'm also reminded of something Chris Ray recently said:

"...I've noticed a bit of a trend in these threads where people who demonstrably do not know a category very well will declare whether things were too easy or too hard. I don't want to only single Conor out here, but I think parts of the post typifies why this is not good."
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by CPiGuy » Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:16 pm

ValenciaQBowl wrote:Daaaamn, Conor, I can't believe you called me out on my lack of knowledge of Florida's national parks! My home state! Cold, man. But seriously, I had no idea that Biscayne and Dry Tortugas were NPs--I figured they were monuments or reserves or something. But good to know. Fortunately this is a private forum, and later I'll delete all the posts and pretend it never happened.

And I can see the trash being a bit odd in this tournament. Some of this is Billy's predilection for people like Kristen Bell,and other trash that's not interesting to people your age. But how did you like Szechuan Sauce? (Too easy?). And what about the Trump handshakes and punching a Nazi questions? Those last two were mine, and I'm not sure I pulled them off; I had an answerline I thought was clever and interesting, but in practice both were probably flawed.

But anyway, seriously, check out Okja.
Actually, those two questions were some of my favorites -- I must have missed them going through my notebook. I'm pretty sure Szechuan sauce got buzzed on the first line by the other team; I don't really remember anything about it.

I didn't think the problem with the trash was that it was odd, and to the contrary, I actually really like seeing different things come up. The problem was (especially for the bonuses) that it wasn't really difficulty-appropriate, and so there were several instances of teams (and not just mine) who were getting 20 or 30 on every other bonus getting 0 or 10 on a trash bonus.

wd4gdz wrote:I like having something to read in the 2017 Delta Burke discussion forum (in addition to the E/Z correction), but I'm also reminded of something Chris Ray recently said:

"...I've noticed a bit of a trend in these threads where people who demonstrably do not know a category very well will declare whether things were too easy or too hard. I don't want to only single Conor out here, but I think parts of the post typifies why this is not good."
I get your point, but I think that (especially for a tournament like this that isn't getting piles and piles of feedback) it's fine to err on the side of offering more feedback rather than less. I trust that people who write tournaments know when they know more things than me, and so the worst-case scenario is just that my feedback gets summarily ignored since I don't know things about that category. I didn't even have a copy of the set at the time -- I was just going through my notebook and writing stuff about all the questions that I made a note about or which stood out to me. Also, with some of the music or art comments, I only mentioned them because our arts player commented that they were hard, so I knew it wasn't just me being bad at art.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by ValenciaQBowl » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:09 pm

The feedback on the Szechuan Sauce question here in Orlando was that it either was answered soon after the end of the first sentence (most people don't remember that Federation alien's name is Cornvelious); the second clue is about the viral video of the asshole going nuts at McDonald's, and people all seemed to know that clue (or in a couple rooms with no R&M fans, not know the question at all.

But I'll keep this in mind for trash for next year.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:43 pm

This set was mostly fine in the tradition of previous Deltas Burke -- I just want to highlight a couple questions that should probably get fixed for later mirrors. The "sun" tossup in the finals had a laughable difficulty cliff when it went from describing some Latvian god in the first line to dropping "Inti" at the beginning of the second line. The Chrysanthemum and the Sword is an incredibly stale line that people are almost certainly only going to know from old packets. The Jung/Myers-Briggs/synchronicity seems way too far into the realm of junk psych (and the question itself even admits that!). The Kristaps Porzingis tossup focused too much on random "you've read this article or you haven't" type factories and was too hard overall it seemed.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by ValenciaQBowl » Tue Nov 21, 2017 4:30 pm

Thanks, Ryan!

I don't think most players at the Orlando site know who Inti is (I might go as far as to say zero do), so that difficulty cliff may not be so bad. But surely the divine Latvian twins the Asvieniai will be moving from this lead-in (and I used them last year in a horse toss-up!) to bonus part to toss-up answer by 2019.

I can agree that Chrysanthemum and the Sword could use a moratorium for a while.

Junk psych is still psych, I'd argue. Because of Jung's influence on the MBTI and other aspects of popular academic culture, I think he's still worth asking about.

Kristaps, yeah, sure. I just wanted that Zing bar product placement.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by bretthogan43 » Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:56 pm

To the guy that wrote the "Trump handshake" question- I wasn't really clear on what that question was asking for. The same thing was true for the TU on "crime" in the first round.

Also, my teammates voiced concerns about the TU length being overly long for a community college field. Other than that, I enjoyed playing the tournament and I thought this year's set was a step up from 2016, which we had read in practice.
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Re: Delta Burke Questions Discussion

Post by ValenciaQBowl » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:54 pm

Thanks for the feedback, Brett.

I'm that guy for both questions.

Here's the toss-up on "crime":

Sampson and Laub created an age-graded, life-course theory of this phenomenon, noting that those who stopped participating in this phenomenon experienced a stabilizing “turning point” like military service, steady employment, and/or marriage. Robert Merton developed Strain Theory to explain increase in the rates of this phenomenon after World War II. A 19th-century Italian thinker posited that a propensity toward this phenomenon was inherited, and could be seen in physical traits like asymmetrical facial structures and long arms. For 10 points, Cesare Lombroso created the formal study of what general antisocial behavior, engaged in by thieves, rapists, and murderers?
ANSWER: crime

I understand that toss-ups on concepts can be tough to follow at game speed, but I'll stand by the phrasing above. Let me know if it reads more clearly when you see it.

And this question is objectively great; you should reconsider:

One of these actions performed in front of press in Brussels was called a “moment of truth” by a participant in it, who explained his aggressive reciprocation of this action by stating that “one shouldn’t make little concessions, even symbolic ones.” One of these actions was offered to a surprised King Philippe of Belgium while its initiator walked beside him toward Emmanuel Macron at the G-8 Summit in May, 2017. Angela Merkel was denied one of these gestures despite press photographers calling out to see it performed. After one of these actions went on for 19 seconds, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe looked over his right shoulder and seemed to express relief it was over. For 10 points, in what common action of greeting does the current US president try to hide his insecurity by aggressively yanking at the arms of world leaders?
ANSWER: Donald Trump handshakes (accept variants that include “Trump” and “handshake”)
Chris Borglum
Valencia College Grand Poobah

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