EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Elaborate on the merits of specific tournaments or have general theoretical discussion here.
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EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Nice hockey Cote d'Azur » Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:23 am

Please discuss specific questions or request to see questions here, with your reason for requesting them.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Pascal Plays Poker » Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:07 pm

Any chance you could post the Nigeria, Abstract Expressionism, and Japanese-Americans tossups?

(was curious on seeing the lead-ins, especially since these were some of the tougher tossups imo)
Last edited by Pascal Plays Poker on Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Auks Ran Ova » Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:30 pm

Nice hockey Cote d'Azur wrote:
Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:23 am
Please discuss specific questions or request to see questions here, with your reason for requesting them.
(doing this generally helps promote discussion in threads such as these, avoiding degeneration into a stream of contextless requests for, and texts of, questions)
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Pascal Plays Poker » Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:50 pm

Sorry about that (above)
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Nice hockey Cote d'Azur » Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:17 pm

Here you go:
EFT wrote:Frederick Lugard laid out the British principles of indirect rule in this modern-day country, where he served as High Commissioner for its northern part. In this modern-day country, King Jaja worked his way out of slavery to rule the state of Opobo, which sold palm oil directly to Britain. Herbert Macaulay founded this country’s first political party and is known as the father of nationalism in it. Usman dan Fodio led a jihad that established the (*) Sokoto Caliphate in the northern part of this country. In the 1930s, this country’s Youth Movement fought for its independence under leaders such as Nnamdi Azikiwe, who would become its first post-independence president. Tensions between this country’s Igbo, Yoruba and Hausa peoples led to Biafra breaking away from this country. For 10 points, name this African country where the British ruled from Lagos.
ANSWER: Nigeria
EFT wrote:The first member of this ethnic group to become a millionaire in the U.S. was a farmer known as “The Potato King.” A 1913 Alien Land Act primarily targeting members of this ethnic group caused many of them to lease land under the names of their native-born children. This ethnic group’s emigration to the U.S. was limited by the informal 1907 Gentleman’s Agreement. One man of this ethnicity changed his name to Clyde Sarah and was arrested after refusing an order to turn himself in to an (*) assembly center. The 442nd Infantry Regiment included mostly members of this ethnic group, such as future Hawaii senator Daniel Inouye. Executive Order 9066 ordered members of this ethnic group sent to camps such as Tule Lake and Manzanar. For 10 points, name this ethnic group whose member Fred Korematsu challenged their internment during World War II.
ANSWER: Japanese-American
EFT wrote:An artist considered to be a precursor to this movement who taught many artists from this movement is known for his push-pull theory and works such as Pompeii and The Golden Wall. An essay titled for a style of painting from this movement describes a conception of art as “an arena in which to act.” An artist from this movement is known for a formal feature called the “zip.” Artists from this movement protesting the exhibit “American Painting Today” were dubbed “The Irascibles.” Hans Hofmann and (*) Franz Kline were members of this art movement alongside an artist who painted a four-canvas series titled after the three colors it repeatedly uses, Who’s Afraid of Red, Yellow, and Blue. Another artist from this movement is best known for his Woman series. For 10 points, what art movement did Barnett Newman, Willem de Kooning, and Jackson Pollock belong to?
ANSWER: abstract expressionism [prompt on “action painting” or “color field” by asking, “what larger movement was that a part of?”]
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by UlyssesInvictus » Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:52 pm

Thanks to Stephen's other post, I just learned a Wolf Hall tossup exists, and now I'd really love to see it, just for the sake of seeing it. (I didn't play all the rounds in the mirror.)

Although, before I even see it, that does seem rather difficult as answerline :/ Not out of the pale, though, I guess.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Milhouse » Sun Sep 30, 2018 9:36 am

I get why you’d want to write a question on _carbon and carbon_, but saying that you want “these two elements” seems objectively misleading. It seems to me that you could pull off the same thing by changing the pronouns and making the answerline _carbon-carbon bonds_ or _making carbon-carbon bonds_ if I’m right in remembering that that’s basically what all the clued reactions are about (and could I see the question to verify that that’s the case?)
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by a bird » Sun Sep 30, 2018 10:35 am

Milhouse wrote:
Sun Sep 30, 2018 9:36 am
I get why you’d want to write a question on _carbon and carbon_, but saying that you want “these two elements” seems objectively misleading. It seems to me that you could pull off the same thing by changing the pronouns and making the answerline _carbon-carbon bonds_ or _making carbon-carbon bonds_ if I’m right in remembering that that’s basically what all the clued reactions are about (and could I see the question to verify that that’s the case?)
I agree with everything in this post. I imagine most people buzzing early must have negged since the answerline was so pathological. (One team at our site said "carbon and ..." and was ruled correct on a protest)

I had a similar experience on the derivatives tossup, when I buzzed with "second derivatives" on the Hessian matrix clue.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg » Sun Sep 30, 2018 7:51 pm

Milhouse wrote:
Sun Sep 30, 2018 9:36 am
I get why you’d want to write a question on _carbon and carbon_, but saying that you want “these two elements” seems objectively misleading. It seems to me that you could pull off the same thing by changing the pronouns and making the answerline _carbon-carbon bonds_ or _making carbon-carbon bonds_ if I’m right in remembering that that’s basically what all the clued reactions are about (and could I see the question to verify that that’s the case?)
EFT Round 5 wrote: 17. A bond between these two elements is reversibly formed and broken in a Wanzlick equilibrium. Some schemes for forming bonds between these two elements use catalytic cycles consisting of oxidative addition, transmetalation, and reductive elimination. A bond forms between these two elements in the first step of a reaction that has a four-membered oxaphosphetane ring intermediate. A bond between these two elements forms in palladium-catalyzed (*) coupling reactions. Organometallic reagents are often used to produce bonds between these two elements by giving one of them an atypical nucleophilic character. Bonds between these two elements are simply drawn as lines with no labels in skeletal structures of molecules. For 10 points, the backbone of organic chemistry consists of bonds between what two elements, which both have an atomic mass of 12?
ANSWER: carbon AND carbon [or C AND C; or two carbons; accept carbon–carbon bonds]
<AW, Chemistry>
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Banned Tiny Toon Adventures Episode » Sun Sep 30, 2018 9:52 pm

yeah sorry that's on me.

I wanted to write a tu on carbon-carbon bond forming reactions as they are extremely important and core to organic chemistry education but couldn't think of a great way to word it and just figured if people knew the clue they'd get over the hump of the weird nounage. Having more time to think about it I probably should have just given an intsruction at the beginning that I am looking for the elements that are in the bond (eg Xe-F or something) which would then allow me to just say "these bonds" (as otherwise it opens up an enormous bag of worms involving stupid answers like sigma bonds and stuff)
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by rùdrâ » Sun Sep 30, 2018 10:21 pm

Could I see the exact wording on the bonus on varna? I'm sure it was just me messing up, but I just want to make sure it was just me being silly by saying jati instead

Edit: Also do you mind showing the religion tossup on india? The christianity clues seemed quite interesting.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Guile Island » Sun Sep 30, 2018 11:37 pm

2018 EFT wrote:A text written as teachings from this figure to a group of sages is known as his namesake “Laws.” For 10 points each:
[10] Name this figure, a son of Brahma who was warned of an impending flood by Vishnu in the form of the giant fish Matsya.
ANSWER: Manu
[10] The Laws of Manu illustrate the Vedic caste system, in which this Sanskrit word is used to denote each class. Examples of groups denoted by this word include the priestly Brahmins and the laborer Shudras.
ANSWER: varṇa
[10] Manu is best known for serving as this figure in Hindu mythology. Other examples of these figures include the Persian Gayomart and Adam.
ANSWER: the first human [or first man]
2018 EFT wrote:A schism between “northists” and “southists” in this country originated with a group of settlers who arrived in the 4th century CE. One religious group in this country declared loyalty to the Syriac church in the Coonan Cross oath and uses a symbol that consists of a cross with flower-like points. This country is home to the remains of Francis (*) Xavier, who visited this country at the beginning of a global mission. This country’s patron saint is an apostle who doubted the resurrection of Christ before touching his wounds. A group of Christians in this country, the Nasrani, coexisted with a branch of the Church of the East along this country’s Malabar Coast. For 10 points, name this country whose Saint Thomas Christians live in its state of Kerala.
ANSWER: Republic of India [or Bharat Ganarajaya]
I wrote both of these questions- I could perhaps change the varna bonus part to include that there are only 4 of them if people were confused about it as is.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by a bird » Mon Oct 01, 2018 9:01 am

I'm not sure exactly what the _bandwidth_ part in the laser bonus from packet 1 was talking about, but it seemed like the same thing as linewidth (see https://www.rp-photonics.com/bandwidth.html).
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Berniecrat » Mon Oct 01, 2018 2:37 pm

For the Inquisition part, was there a reason Council of Blood not accepted or prompted?
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Nice hockey Cote d'Azur » Mon Oct 01, 2018 6:21 pm

Berniecrat wrote:
Mon Oct 01, 2018 2:37 pm
For the Inquisition part, was there a reason Council of Blood not accepted or prompted?
By my understanding, it’s not quite equivalent since the Council of Blood occurred later and was primarily meant to target rebel lords. My apologies if there was any ambiguity.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by a bird » Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:20 pm

The Hessian matrix clue in the derivatives tossup probably caused a few negs with "second derivatives."
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by shmno » Fri Oct 05, 2018 10:51 am

The bonus part on Wernicke said that damage to Wernicke's area could cause expressive aphasia, when I think it meant to say receptive aphasia.
The bonus part on "isomer" from the Mossbauer spec bonus seemed to describe isomer shift in the first portion, then define an isotope in the second.

The carbon-carbon TU played smoothly in my room but I thought it could be potentially confusing.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Iamteehee » Tue Oct 09, 2018 7:36 pm

Ryan Rosenberg wanted me to say something so I'll say that the changing of the pronoun to these bonds on the C-C tossup was at least partially responsible for me negging the tossup with "organometallic" on oxidative addition.

Edit: by the time I had buzzed in, transmetalation had been said. While the smarter thing to do there would be to realize that the answer probably wouldn't be organometallic there, my anecdote still does highlight how the revised tossup is suboptimal.
FWIW, I probably would have pulled the correct answer if the pronoun had been "these two elements."
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by cyclohexane » Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:05 am

For the Critique of Pure Reason bonus, if I recall correctly, it said that David Hume read it and it awoke him from his "dogmatic slumbers." This is wrong, Kant read and said that about Hume. Hume died before Critique of Pure Reason was published.

Edit: Also, maybe most people playing didn't reach the final clue of the Religion tossup on California, but I think that should be changed. I believe the giveaway was almost literally "Name this state that contains Los Angeles." It was perhaps the most flagrantly easy giveaway in the entire set, which really seemed out of place on an otherwise rather hard tossup.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by AGoodMan » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:35 am

Nice hockey Cote d'Azur wrote:
Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:17 pm
Here you go:
EFT wrote:The first member of this ethnic group to become a millionaire in the U.S. was a farmer known as “The Potato King.” A 1913 Alien Land Act primarily targeting members of this ethnic group caused many of them to lease land under the names of their native-born children. This ethnic group’s emigration to the U.S. was limited by the informal 1907 Gentleman’s Agreement. One man of this ethnicity changed his name to Clyde Sarah and was arrested after refusing an order to turn himself in to an (*) assembly center. The 442nd Infantry Regiment included mostly members of this ethnic group, such as future Hawaii senator Daniel Inouye. Executive Order 9066 ordered members of this ethnic group sent to camps such as Tule Lake and Manzanar. For 10 points, name this ethnic group whose member Fred Korematsu challenged their internment during World War II.
Was the Japanese-American tossup changed since this previous post? I remember distinctly buzzing on Gentleman's Agreement and getting a 10.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Nice hockey Cote d'Azur » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:40 am

AGoodMan wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:35 am
Nice hockey Cote d'Azur wrote:
Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:17 pm
Here you go:
EFT wrote:The first member of this ethnic group to become a millionaire in the U.S. was a farmer known as “The Potato King.” A 1913 Alien Land Act primarily targeting members of this ethnic group caused many of them to lease land under the names of their native-born children. This ethnic group’s emigration to the U.S. was limited by the informal 1907 Gentleman’s Agreement. One man of this ethnicity changed his name to Clyde Sarah and was arrested after refusing an order to turn himself in to an (*) assembly center. The 442nd Infantry Regiment included mostly members of this ethnic group, such as future Hawaii senator Daniel Inouye. Executive Order 9066 ordered members of this ethnic group sent to camps such as Tule Lake and Manzanar. For 10 points, name this ethnic group whose member Fred Korematsu challenged their internment during World War II.
Was the Japanese-American tossup changed since this previous post? I remember distinctly buzzing on Gentleman's Agreement and getting a 10.
Yes, that clue was moved following the online mirror.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Nice hockey Cote d'Azur » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:48 am

cyclohexane wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:05 am
For the Critique of Pure Reason bonus, if I recall correctly, it said that David Hume read it and it awoke him from his "dogmatic slumbers." This is wrong, Kant read and said that about Hume. Hume died before Critique of Pure Reason was published.
You’re right about that, sorry for the error.
cyclohexane wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:05 am
Edit: Also, maybe most people playing didn't reach the final clue of the Religion tossup on California, but I think that should be changed. I believe the giveaway was almost literally "Name this state that contains Los Angeles." It was perhaps the most flagrantly easy giveaway in the entire set, which really seemed out of place on an otherwise rather hard tossup.
I think this is probably a consequence of not hearing too many giveaways, at this level there are many tossups with extremely easy giveaways. This is surely one of the easier ones but there’s no real problem with making them easy as long as there isn’t a big cliff, which there didn’t seem to be here based on the stats.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by cruzeiro » Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:10 pm

Can I see the tossup on British anthropologists? I (and at least one other room) negged with France on the structuralism clue (seemed like bait for Lévi-Strauss)
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by A Very Long Math Tossup » Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:23 pm

cruzeiro wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:10 pm
Can I see the tossup on British anthropologists? I (and at least one other room) negged with France on the structuralism clue (seemed like bait for Lévi-Strauss)
I also did this. I buzzed at structural, IIRC, but the question was asking about structural functionalism.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg » Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:26 pm

cruzeiro wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 3:10 pm
Can I see the tossup on British anthropologists? I (and at least one other room) negged with France on the structuralism clue (seemed like bait for Lévi-Strauss)
EFT Packet 3 wrote:An anthropologist from this country wrote the remarkably detailed ethnography The Todas (“TOH-duh’s”) despite spending less than six months with the Toda people. The Polish-born anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski published Argonauts of the Western Pacific while living in this country, which is where he taught before moving to America. An anthropologist from this country, often considered to be the founder of structural functionalism, wrote the book The (*) Andaman Islanders. A man from this country wrote a trilogy of classic works of social anthropology on the Nuer (“NOO-er”) people. An anthropologist from this country wrote about the ritual sacrifice of the priest-king of Nemi in The Golden Bough. For 10 points, name this country that is home to the anthropologists E. E. Evans-Pritchard, Alfred Radcliffe-Brown, and James Frazer.
ANSWER: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [or UK; accept Great Britain; accept England before “priest-king” because James Frazer is from Scotland
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by jmarvin_ » Sun Oct 14, 2018 4:36 pm

I negged with USA when they dropped Argonauts of the Western Pacific because of Malinowski's association with Columbia, only to immediately hear "before he moved to the US." It might have been better to reverse those clauses, in which case the answer would have been unambiguous to those who can't remember when precisely the events of Malinowski's life and his publications were ordered.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by women, fire and dangerous things » Sun Oct 14, 2018 6:13 pm

My logic in writing the question was the exact converse of that: the order is pyramidal because you can buzz on the second clause with less precise knowledge of Malinowski's career. Of course, you can also buzz on the first clause with partial knowledge, as you did, but you take a risk by doing so.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by A Very Long Math Tossup » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:16 am

Could you post the tossup on "postmodernism"? I recall Lyotard's definition being clued very early.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by 100% Clean Comedian Dan Nainan » Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:01 am

Can I see the tossups on France (painting) and Venus (ditto)? I'd like to see which paintings the early clues were drawn from.

Can I also see the Adichie tossup? It didn't stop me from buzzing, but I remember the first sentence seemed like an odd way to describe Americanah at game speed, though I could've just misheard something.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg » Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:59 am

100% Clean Comedian Dan Nainan wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:01 am
Can I also see the Adichie tossup? It didn't stop me from buzzing, but I remember the first sentence seemed like an odd way to describe Americanah at game speed, though I could've just misheard something.
EFT Packet 1 wrote:The main character of a novel by this author travels from Princeton to Trenton to get her hair braided. That character created by this author breaks up with her boyfriend, the African-American professor Blaine, before emigrating back home. This author described writing stories about children who played in the snow and drank ginger beer in her talk “The Danger of a Single Story,” which cites (*) Chinua Achebe for exposing her to African literature. She writes about being denied the role of hall monitor despite earning the role because she is not a boy in a 2014 essay that sets out a vision of modern feminism. For 10 points, name this contemporary Nigerian author who wrote about Obinze and Ifemelu in the novel Americanah and authored the essay “We Should All Be Feminists.”
ANSWER: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Looking at the buzzes here, plenty of people buzzed on the first sentence, and the two negs were on answers of "Chimamanda" and "Americanah", so I'll defend this as being sufficiently clear to parse (although maybe a line too early).
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by 100% Clean Comedian Dan Nainan » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:32 pm

Geriatric trauma wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:59 am
100% Clean Comedian Dan Nainan wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:01 am
Can I also see the Adichie tossup? It didn't stop me from buzzing, but I remember the first sentence seemed like an odd way to describe Americanah at game speed, though I could've just misheard something.
EFT Packet 1 wrote:The main character of a novel by this author travels from Princeton to Trenton to get her hair braided. That character created by this author breaks up with her boyfriend, the African-American professor Blaine, before emigrating back home. This author described writing stories about children who played in the snow and drank ginger beer in her talk “The Danger of a Single Story,” which cites (*) Chinua Achebe for exposing her to African literature. She writes about being denied the role of hall monitor despite earning the role because she is not a boy in a 2014 essay that sets out a vision of modern feminism. For 10 points, name this contemporary Nigerian author who wrote about Obinze and Ifemelu in the novel Americanah and authored the essay “We Should All Be Feminists.”
ANSWER: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Looking at the buzzes here, plenty of people buzzed on the first sentence, and the two negs were on answers of "Chimamanda" and "Americanah", so I'll defend this as being sufficiently clear to parse (although maybe a line too early).
Yeah, I definitely just misheard something in game. Thanks!
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by _nestorius » Mon Oct 15, 2018 7:14 pm

Can I see the tossup on the Book of Judges? I'm curious as to what translation was used for the quotation in the first line, as I remember it being different from the translations I've read.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Missing Shade of Blue » Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:28 pm

I believe the bonus part on glycolysis stated that it is followed by the citric acid cycle in anaerobes, which is in fact true of aerobes.
The bonus part on Faraday's constant described it as the charge of a Coulomb, rather than a mole, of electrons.

Can I see the bonus on integration? My impression was that the question didn't exclude a possible answer of "solving differential equations" for the first part (particularly since it mentions Runge-Kutta).

The tossup on George Washington's slaves was a well-written tossup on an interesting answer line which I really enjoyed.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Nice hockey Cote d'Azur » Mon Oct 15, 2018 11:54 pm

_nestorius wrote: Can I see the tossup on the Book of Judges? I'm curious as to what translation was used for the quotation in the first line, as I remember it being different from the translations I've read.
EFT wrote: The final verse of this book declares that “everyone did as they saw fit,” a phrase repeatedly used throughout this book. In an anecdote from this book, people crossing the river Jordan are asked to say the word shibboleth. This book states that “in those times, Israel had no king” before stating that Israel had 40 years of peace after the campaigns of (*) Othniel. In this book, Jael hammers a pin into Sisera’s head while he sleeps in her tent after Barak is ordered by Deborah to defeat Sisera’s army. A man finds dew on a fleece of wool on a threshing floor in this book in which a man kills 300 Philistines with an ass’s jawbone before being betrayed by Delilah. For 10 points, name this book, whose title Biblical figures include Gideon and Samson.
ANSWER: Book of Judges [or Sefer Shoftim]
This quote appears to be from the NIV.
Missing Shade of Blue wrote: Can I see the bonus on integration? My impression was that the question didn't exclude a possible answer of "solving differential equations" for the first part (particularly since it mentions Runge-Kutta).
EFT wrote:Rather complex forms of performing this operation make use of temporal discretization and include the Lax–Wendroff method. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this operation that is performed numerically, and not analytically, in both the Euler algorithm and the Runge–Kutta (“ROON-guh KOOT-ah”) methods.
ANSWER: (numerical) integration [accept word forms of integrating]
[10] In general, higher-order methods for integrating reduce this quantity. Users of numerical methods often worry about a form of this quantity caused by rounding or truncation.
ANSWER: error [accept numerical error or roundoff error]
[10] This second-order numerical integration algorithm updates the position and velocity steps at every other time-delta, in an “interleaved” manner. It is often considered to be an improvement of the Verlet (“vair-lay”) method.
ANSWER: leapfrog algorithm
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg » Tue Oct 16, 2018 12:00 am

100% Clean Comedian Dan Nainan wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:01 am
Can I see the tossups on France (painting) and Venus (ditto)? I'd like to see which paintings the early clues were drawn from.
EFT Packet 11 wrote:The initial exhibition of a painting by an artist from this country led another artist to proclaim that “it’s the alpha and omega of painting.” A work by another artist born in this country was inspired by an event in which his wife mistook him for a demon while lying facedown on a bed, “her eyes wide with fear.” The centers of many paintings by an artist from this country show lions eating other animals, such as in The Repast of the Lion and The Hungry Lion Throws Itself on the Antelope. That artist from this country painted many (*) “jungle scenes,” including one in which his lover Yadwiga watches a man charm a snake titled The Dream. Primitivist painters from this country include Henri Rousseau and a man who painted Spirit of the Dead Watching during his travels to Tahiti. For 10 points, name this country home to Paul Gauguin.
ANSWER: France [or French Republic; or République française]
EFT Packet 9 wrote:This figure and the Three Graces present gifts to a young woman in a fresco that, like its artist’s A Young Man Being Introduced to the Seven Liberal Arts, was painted for a villa belonging to Giovanni Tornabuoni. This figure, fully clothed, watches a nude figure sleeping in a painting in which several satyrs, one of which has his head encased in a large helmet, play with a (*) lance. In a painting named after this figure, one of the Horae, possibly representing Spring, holds out a billowing cloak. In that painting, the floating wind god Zephyr carries a nymph and blows a line of air at this figure, who covers her genitals with her hair. For 10 points, name this goddess who emerges from the sea on a shell in a Sandro Botticelli painting of her birth.
ANSWER: Venus [do not accept or prompt on “Aphrodite”]
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by A Very Long Math Tossup » Tue Oct 16, 2018 12:19 am

Nice hockey Cote d'Azur wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 11:54 pm
Missing Shade of Blue wrote: Can I see the bonus on integration? My impression was that the question didn't exclude a possible answer of "solving differential equations" for the first part (particularly since it mentions Runge-Kutta).
EFT wrote:Rather complex forms of performing this operation make use of temporal discretization and include the Lax–Wendroff method. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this operation that is performed numerically, and not analytically, in both the Euler algorithm and the Runge–Kutta (“ROON-guh KOOT-ah”) methods.
ANSWER: (numerical) integration [accept word forms of integrating]
[10] In general, higher-order methods for integrating reduce this quantity. Users of numerical methods often worry about a form of this quantity caused by rounding or truncation.
ANSWER: error [accept numerical error or roundoff error]
[10] This second-order numerical integration algorithm updates the position and velocity steps at every other time-delta, in an “interleaved” manner. It is often considered to be an improvement of the Verlet (“vair-lay”) method.
ANSWER: leapfrog algorithm
As someone in computational physics, Ian is extremely correct. All of the methods mentioned in the tossup are used for numerically solving differential equations, which is called "integration" because (a) IVPs reduce to definite integrals by FTC, and (b) because "integrator" is easier to say than "numerical DE solver."

BTW, if my request got lost in the shuffle, I'd still like to see the TU on postmodernism.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Nice hockey Cote d'Azur » Tue Oct 16, 2018 12:55 am

A Very Long Math Tossup wrote: Could you post the tossup on "postmodernism"? I recall Lyotard's definition being clued very early.
EFT wrote: A 1993 book named for this adjective includes a story that begins by telling its end: “the Sun is going to explode.” Those “fables” of this type were created by a philosopher who argued that this movement caused the sublime to be reborn, and that this movement can be defined as incredulity towards concepts that explain all of history, which that philosopher termed “metanarratives.” Fredric Jameson wrote that this movement is characterized by pastiche, (*) parody, and ironic works of art. Jean-François Lyotard characterized it as disillusionment of the view that science, or knowledge, is progress in a book about the “condition” of this movement. For 10 points, name this intellectual movement, a response to its predecessor, modernity.
ANSWER: postmodernism
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by 100% Clean Comedian Dan Nainan » Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:26 pm

Could the tossups on Glucagon and egg cells be posted? A teammate of mine negged with similar answers on both and wanted to see the tossups.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by AGoodMan » Fri Oct 19, 2018 10:30 am

Can I see the Bahai tossup? It's a topic that I spent a decent amount of time studying, but didn't know any of the clues in the question until "Seven Valleys."
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg » Fri Oct 19, 2018 12:29 pm

100% Clean Comedian Dan Nainan wrote:
Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:26 pm
Could the tossups on Glucagon and egg cells be posted? A teammate of mine negged with similar answers on both and wanted to see the tossups.
AGoodMan wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 10:30 am
Can I see the Bahai tossup? It's a topic that I spent a decent amount of time studying, but didn't know any of the clues in the question until "Seven Valleys."
EFT Packet 8 wrote:A receptor partially named for this compound is activated by a peptide found in Gila monster venom. A peptide that is “like” this compound is an example of an incretin, whose production is blocked by DPP-4 inhibitors like Januvia. This compound upregulates a pathway that uses enzymes like HMG-CoA lyase to synthesize ketone bodies. This hormone stimulates a pathway whose rate-limiting step uses a (*) phosphorylase enzyme to break a terminal alpha 1 to 4 linkage. This hormone promotes the breakdown of triglycerides and glycogen, acting as the body’s main catabolic hormone. The alpha cells of the pancreas produce this hormone. For 10 points, name this hormone that raises the concentration of glucose in the bloodstream, which acts in opposition to insulin.
ANSWER: glucagon
EFT Packet 9 wrote:In these cells, Emi2 is believed to be the “cytostatic factor” that inhibits the APC/C cyclosome. One stage of these cells’ development relies on breakdown of the germinal vesicle. The extracellular matrix of these cells is surrounded by cumulus cells, whose inner layer is the corona radiata. These cells contain vesicles full of proteases, peroxidases, and sugars that form the hyaline layer during the cortical reaction, which occurs after a wave of (*) calcium ions is released. The structure surrounding these cells contains granulosa and theca cells and degenerates into the corpus luteum. During development, these cells receive disproportionately more cytoplasm than polar bodies and are arrested in prophase I until puberty. For 10 points, name these cells that combine with sperm during fertilization.
ANSWER: egg [or oocyte, or oogonium, or ova; or primary oocyte; or secondary oocyte]
EFT Finals 1 wrote:A text sacred to this religion contains appropriately-named “short,” “medium,” and “long” prayers, and was amended with a series of 107 questions and answers. A leader of this religion documented its first century of existence in the book God Passes By. Followers of this religion who promote dissenting doctrine are labelled “covenant-breakers” by its central governing body. There are only two extant (*) photographs of this religion’s founder, who wrote works like the Seven Valleys. Translations of the scriptures of this religion are overseen by the Haifa-based Universal House of Justice. The Book of Certitude is a sacred text of, for 10 points, what religion whose adherents believe that figures like Buddha, Jesus, and Bahá’u’lláh are all Manifestations of God?
ANSWER: Bahá’í Faith
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by The Abydos Helicopter » Sat Oct 20, 2018 7:16 pm

A quick note, might come back with more once I've got a copy of the set - if I remember correctly, Glaucus and Diomedes exchanging armour came up twice, with each used as a clue for the other
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Slightly Less British » Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:03 pm

Is there any chance of seeing the text for both the Irish famine TU and the populism TU? I remember not being a massive fan of either, but actually seeing them would be helpful.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by not quite » Sun Oct 21, 2018 12:43 am

EFT Packet 8 wrote:
A receptor partially named for this compound is activated by a peptide found in Gila monster venom. A peptide that is “like” this compound is an example of an incretin, whose production is blocked by DPP-4 inhibitors like Januvia. This compound upregulates a pathway that uses enzymes like HMG-CoA lyase to synthesize ketone bodies. This hormone stimulates a pathway whose rate-limiting step uses a (*) phosphorylase enzyme to break a terminal alpha 1 to 4 linkage. This hormone promotes the breakdown of triglycerides and glycogen, acting as the body’s main catabolic hormone. The alpha cells of the pancreas produce this hormone. For 10 points, name this hormone that raises the concentration of glucose in the bloodstream, which acts in opposition to insulin.
ANSWER: glucagon
Looking at the detailed stats, I think this was the most-negged tossup in the whole tournament! I don't think it's a bad tossup, but I do have two comments about it that might be helpful in general, both related to the underlined clue.

1. IMO it's desirable to use generic rather than brand names of drugs--in this case sitagliptin instead of Januvia. Quizbowl is also played outside of the US where brand names could be different, schools teach generic names, and pharma companies don't need the extra publicity.

2. It's hard to parse complex biochemical pathways at game speed! Have a look at the chemical pathway that Januvia is involved with: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... rs.svg.png This clue could be made easier by using a clue about, say, exenatide (an incretin) instead of Januvia. My general point here is to consider that clues about multi-step pathways can be harder for a player than they seem for the writer.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg » Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:16 pm

Slightly Less British wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:03 pm
Is there any chance of seeing the text for both the Irish famine TU and the populism TU? I remember not being a massive fan of either, but actually seeing them would be helpful.
Addressing this event, the Economist wrote that the “first law of civilization” is that “every breach of the laws of morality and social order brings its own punishment and inconvenience.” During this event, the “Gregory clause” and the Encumbered Estates Act were enacted, giving rise to the “Three Fs” of fair rent, free sale, and fixity of tenure, which guided the Tenant Right League in their campaign for land reform in the following decade. This event, which culminated in the “Black ’47,” resulted in a nearly complete shift away from a native language to (*) English and the mass emigration of over two million people on so-called “coffin ships.” The repeal of the Corn Laws did not alleviate, for 10 points, what period of 19th-century mass starvation that began with a blight on a British colony’s staple crop?
ANSWER: Irish potato famine [or Great Irish Famine; or An Drochshaol; or an Gorta Mór; accept any answer mentioning Ireland or Irish and the concept of a great famine or potato famine]
Cas Mudde argues that this ideology is supported by the re-adoption of “Tina” arguments by political leaders. Regimes that subscribe to this ideology are characterized by mass clientelism and often discriminatory legalism. A Jan-Werner Müller book titled “What Is” this ideology defines it as a rejection of pluralism. This ideology favors referendums and other examples of (*) direct democracy. The Latin American “pink tide” and European leaders such as Viktor Orbán are often cited as examples of this ideology’s resurgence. Politicians who subscribe to this ideology often attempt to contrast their supporters with “the elite.” For 10 points, name this political ideology that seeks to appeal to the common interest.
ANSWER: populism [prompt on demagoguery before “clientelism”]
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by Periplus of the Erythraean Sea » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:24 pm

Cas Mudde argues that this ideology is supported by the re-adoption of “Tina” arguments by political leaders. Regimes that subscribe to this ideology are characterized by mass clientelism and often discriminatory legalism. A Jan-Werner Müller book titled “What Is” this ideology defines it as a rejection of pluralism. This ideology favors referendums and other examples of (*) direct democracy. The Latin American “pink tide” and European leaders such as Viktor Orbán are often cited as examples of this ideology’s resurgence. Politicians who subscribe to this ideology often attempt to contrast their supporters with “the elite.” For 10 points, name this political ideology that seeks to appeal to the common interest.
ANSWER: populism [prompt on demagoguery before “clientelism”]
Are all of these clues really unique? I've highlighted in red clues that I think fail to pin down a specific answer of "populism." Having one such clue in a tossup can be fine, but I think most of this tossup is pretty vague about what it's looking for. Maybe "populism" is a term of art in political science, but despite being familiar with every clue in this question that's not referring to a specific book, I would be completely unable to buzz throughout almost the entire question because I would have no idea what it wanted me to say.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by ryanrosenberg » Wed Oct 24, 2018 12:35 am

Periplus of the Erythraean Sea wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:24 pm
Cas Mudde argues that this ideology is supported by the re-adoption of “Tina” arguments by political leaders. Regimes that subscribe to this ideology are characterized by mass clientelism and often discriminatory legalism. A Jan-Werner Müller book titled “What Is” this ideology defines it as a rejection of pluralism. This ideology favors referendums and other examples of (*) direct democracy. The Latin American “pink tide” and European leaders such as Viktor Orbán are often cited as examples of this ideology’s resurgence. Politicians who subscribe to this ideology often attempt to contrast their supporters with “the elite.” For 10 points, name this political ideology that seeks to appeal to the common interest.
ANSWER: populism [prompt on demagoguery before “clientelism”]
Are all of these clues really unique? I've highlighted in red clues that I think fail to pin down a specific answer of "populism." Having one such clue in a tossup can be fine, but I think most of this tossup is pretty vague about what it's looking for. Maybe "populism" is a term of art in political science, but despite being familiar with every clue in this question that's not referring to a specific book, I would be completely unable to buzz throughout almost the entire question because I would have no idea what it wanted me to say.
Populism is both a contested term and a relatively new term in political science, so there aren't a lot of nailed-down clues to work from (especially at this difficulty level). Nevertheless, it's an important and very relevant topic so I wanted to write a tossup that rewarded having read about populism. I did this by using a lot of contextual clues, that, while not necessarily unique, both point to populism as the most likely answer and help rule out other answers. For example, the referendums and direct democracy clue could also apply to, say, some sort of radical egalitarianism, but that would be clearly ruled out by the clue about clientelism and discriminatory legalism. This isn't my preferred way of writing a tossup, but I think it can be effective if clues are chosen carefully.

However, this tossup played out sub-optimally at sites so far with a lot of negs, so it looks like my execution here was less than perfect. In particular, the second sentence and the clue about Orbán and the pink tide had a lot of negs in the middle of the clue. Adding something to tip people off that the clue isn't done would alleviate that issue.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by The Abydos Helicopter » Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:42 am

At least at our site, criticism of the populism tossup included that fact that it's not really an ideology, which led to negs with answers that are definitively ideologies.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by touchpack » Tue Oct 30, 2018 1:28 pm

not quite wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 12:43 am
EFT Packet 8 wrote:
A receptor partially named for this compound is activated by a peptide found in Gila monster venom. A peptide that is “like” this compound is an example of an incretin, whose production is blocked by DPP-4 inhibitors like Januvia. This compound upregulates a pathway that uses enzymes like HMG-CoA lyase to synthesize ketone bodies. This hormone stimulates a pathway whose rate-limiting step uses a (*) phosphorylase enzyme to break a terminal alpha 1 to 4 linkage. This hormone promotes the breakdown of triglycerides and glycogen, acting as the body’s main catabolic hormone. The alpha cells of the pancreas produce this hormone. For 10 points, name this hormone that raises the concentration of glucose in the bloodstream, which acts in opposition to insulin.
ANSWER: glucagon
Looking at the detailed stats, I think this was the most-negged tossup in the whole tournament! I don't think it's a bad tossup, but I do have two comments about it that might be helpful in general, both related to the underlined clue.

1. IMO it's desirable to use generic rather than brand names of drugs--in this case sitagliptin instead of Januvia. Quizbowl is also played outside of the US where brand names could be different, schools teach generic names, and pharma companies don't need the extra publicity.

2. It's hard to parse complex biochemical pathways at game speed! Have a look at the chemical pathway that Januvia is involved with: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... rs.svg.png This clue could be made easier by using a clue about, say, exenatide (an incretin) instead of Januvia. My general point here is to consider that clues about multi-step pathways can be harder for a player than they seem for the writer.
Your point about brand-names is well-taken--I used the brand name because no generic exists yet due to patent law, but you're right that it's likely that schools are gonna be using the chemical name.

I chose to clue Januvia rather than exenatide because, in my real-world experience, Januvia is MUCH more widely prescribed than exenatide (probably because the former can be given orally whereas the latter is only subq). I'm sympathetic to the argument that the latter makes for a more easily parsed sentence, but the former is definitely a thing more people will know about.

To be honest, I'm pretty sure most of the players who negged on that clue did so because they have a binary association between "X-like" and "insulin" because IGFs come up quite a bit in quizbowl and insulin is tossed up more often than glucagon, and I don't have much sympathy for that. I do have sympathy for people that confused the details of biochem pathways and negged on the 2nd or 3rd sentences (imo those are the most confusing ones, the later ones are super clear), so apologies if that was you.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by sharkcrossing » Wed Nov 14, 2018 1:13 pm

Was there a good reason not to at least prompt on buffalo for the bison question? Yea, technically they are not true buffalo, but are commonly known as "American buffalo" both by the general public and indigenous groups.
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Re: EFT 2018 - Specific Question Discussion

Post by rahulkeyal » Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:22 pm

Could I see the tossups on Henry Fielding, Toni Morrison, and George Eliot? Despite all of these authors being quite prominent, I remember being lost for the majority of these tossups, and judging from the stats (0, 1, and 2 powers, respectively, over 78 rooms), it seems like this wasn't unique to me.
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